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Inhibition of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 prevents the dysfunctional cardiac substrate metabolism in fatty acid synthase-transgenic mice


Abd Alla, Joshua; Graemer, Muriel; Fu, Xuebin; Quitterer, Ursula (2016). Inhibition of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 prevents the dysfunctional cardiac substrate metabolism in fatty acid synthase-transgenic mice. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 291:2583-2600.

Abstract

Impairment of myocardial fatty acid substrate metabolism is characteristic of late-stage heart failure and has limited treatment options. Here we investigated whether inhibition of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) could counteract the disturbed substrate metabolism of late-stage heart failure. The heart failure-like substrate metabolism was reproduced in a novel transgenic model of myocardium-specific expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN), the major palmitate-synthesizing enzyme. The increased fatty acid utilization of FASN-transgenic neonatal cardiomyocytes rapidly switched to a heart failure phenotype in an adult-like lipogenic milieu. Similarly, adult FASN-transgenic mice developed signs of heart failure. The development of disturbed substrate utilization of FASN-transgenic cardiomyocytes and signs of heart failure were retarded by the transgenic expression of GRKInh, a peptide inhibitor of GRK2. Cardioprotective GRK2 inhibition required an intact ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) axis, which blunted the induction of cardiotoxic transcripts, in part by enhanced serine-273 phosphorylation of Pparg (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ). Conversely, the dual-specific GRK2 and ERK cascade inhibitor, RKIP (raf kinase inhibitor protein), triggered dysfunctional cardiomyocyte energetics and the expression of heart failure-promoting Pparg-regulated genes. Thus, GRK2 inhibition is a novel approach that targets the dysfunctional substrate metabolism of the failing heart.

Abstract

Impairment of myocardial fatty acid substrate metabolism is characteristic of late-stage heart failure and has limited treatment options. Here we investigated whether inhibition of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) could counteract the disturbed substrate metabolism of late-stage heart failure. The heart failure-like substrate metabolism was reproduced in a novel transgenic model of myocardium-specific expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN), the major palmitate-synthesizing enzyme. The increased fatty acid utilization of FASN-transgenic neonatal cardiomyocytes rapidly switched to a heart failure phenotype in an adult-like lipogenic milieu. Similarly, adult FASN-transgenic mice developed signs of heart failure. The development of disturbed substrate utilization of FASN-transgenic cardiomyocytes and signs of heart failure were retarded by the transgenic expression of GRKInh, a peptide inhibitor of GRK2. Cardioprotective GRK2 inhibition required an intact ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) axis, which blunted the induction of cardiotoxic transcripts, in part by enhanced serine-273 phosphorylation of Pparg (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ). Conversely, the dual-specific GRK2 and ERK cascade inhibitor, RKIP (raf kinase inhibitor protein), triggered dysfunctional cardiomyocyte energetics and the expression of heart failure-promoting Pparg-regulated genes. Thus, GRK2 inhibition is a novel approach that targets the dysfunctional substrate metabolism of the failing heart.

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2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:15 December 2016
Deposited On:12 Feb 2016 09:33
Last Modified:30 Oct 2016 08:39
Publisher:American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
ISSN:0021-9258
Additional Information:This research was originally published in Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2016 The Journal of Biological Chemistry, 291, 2583-2600 © the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M115.702688
PubMed ID:26670611

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