UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Zeitschrift für Slawistik, special issue : Contemporary Eastern European political discourse


Zeitschrift für Slawistik, special issue : Contemporary Eastern European political discourse. Edited by: Weiss, Daniel (2016). Deutschland: De Gruyter.

Abstract

On the 19th–20th October 2013 the Slavic Department of the University of Zürich hosted a conference under the heading “Ain’t misbehavin’ – Implicit and explicit strategies in Eastern European political discourse” which brought together twelve specialists from nine countries. The main stimulus for this initiative originated from the awareness that a quarter of a century after the fall of the socialist system in Eastern Europe, time had come to reassess political discourse in the newly arisen democracies from a comparative pragmatic perspective: to what extent do the most salient communicative strategies in different post-socialist countries diverge today, how deeply are these divergences rooted in pre-socialist cultural traditions and/or different political systems? Do they still share any characteristics that separate them from Central or Western Europe, or has the overwhelming impact of globalisation eliminated the last traces of the socialist past? By publishing the present volume, we do not claim to provide full-fledged answers to all these questions but to elucidate at least some relevant issues related to them. The volume presents nine contributions based on the papers held at the conference. They cover four Eastern European countries: Russia, Poland, Czechia and Romania. The inclusion of Romania in a special issue of a journal of Slavic studies might at the first sight call for an explanation; however, the different genetic affiliations of the languages under examination have no bearing on the characteristics of political discourse to be described here and their possible roots in the common socialist past. The scrutiny of parliamentary debates dominates in five papers, the remaining ones encompass other genres, such as televised political interviews, press commentaries, and computer-mediated communication (blogs and Twitter hashtags). Several authors adopted a neo-Gricean approach combined with relevance theory, discourse analysis or impoliteness theory, others resorted to cognitive semantics and humour theory. The topics range from rhetorical questions to linguistic violence to blends as catchwords and to negation in the co-construction of political identity. Four papers by M. Berrocal, C. Ilie & A. Ştefănescu, M. Sivenkova and D.Weiss focus on the typology and functional analysis of intertextuality in political discourse, exploring such diverse aspects as the role of historical reminiscences, quotations as a vehicle of meta- *Corresponding author: Prof. Dr. em. Daniel Weiss, Slavonic Seminar, University of Zürich, Plattenstr. 43, 8032 Zürich, E ˗ Mail: dawe@slav.uzh.ch Zeitschrift für Slawistik 2016; 61(1): 1–2 phor-driven argumentation or face threatening acts, salient culture- and genrerelated differences in using prior texts, etc. Thus, by offering a manifold comparative perspective across different countries and genres, this volume may be considered a first step to fill the gap in comparative research on political discourse in the post-socialist part of Europe.

Abstract

On the 19th–20th October 2013 the Slavic Department of the University of Zürich hosted a conference under the heading “Ain’t misbehavin’ – Implicit and explicit strategies in Eastern European political discourse” which brought together twelve specialists from nine countries. The main stimulus for this initiative originated from the awareness that a quarter of a century after the fall of the socialist system in Eastern Europe, time had come to reassess political discourse in the newly arisen democracies from a comparative pragmatic perspective: to what extent do the most salient communicative strategies in different post-socialist countries diverge today, how deeply are these divergences rooted in pre-socialist cultural traditions and/or different political systems? Do they still share any characteristics that separate them from Central or Western Europe, or has the overwhelming impact of globalisation eliminated the last traces of the socialist past? By publishing the present volume, we do not claim to provide full-fledged answers to all these questions but to elucidate at least some relevant issues related to them. The volume presents nine contributions based on the papers held at the conference. They cover four Eastern European countries: Russia, Poland, Czechia and Romania. The inclusion of Romania in a special issue of a journal of Slavic studies might at the first sight call for an explanation; however, the different genetic affiliations of the languages under examination have no bearing on the characteristics of political discourse to be described here and their possible roots in the common socialist past. The scrutiny of parliamentary debates dominates in five papers, the remaining ones encompass other genres, such as televised political interviews, press commentaries, and computer-mediated communication (blogs and Twitter hashtags). Several authors adopted a neo-Gricean approach combined with relevance theory, discourse analysis or impoliteness theory, others resorted to cognitive semantics and humour theory. The topics range from rhetorical questions to linguistic violence to blends as catchwords and to negation in the co-construction of political identity. Four papers by M. Berrocal, C. Ilie & A. Ştefănescu, M. Sivenkova and D.Weiss focus on the typology and functional analysis of intertextuality in political discourse, exploring such diverse aspects as the role of historical reminiscences, quotations as a vehicle of meta- *Corresponding author: Prof. Dr. em. Daniel Weiss, Slavonic Seminar, University of Zürich, Plattenstr. 43, 8032 Zürich, E ˗ Mail: dawe@slav.uzh.ch Zeitschrift für Slawistik 2016; 61(1): 1–2 phor-driven argumentation or face threatening acts, salient culture- and genrerelated differences in using prior texts, etc. Thus, by offering a manifold comparative perspective across different countries and genres, this volume may be considered a first step to fill the gap in comparative research on political discourse in the post-socialist part of Europe.

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 02 Feb 2016
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Edited Scientific Work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Slavonic Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:490 Other languages
410 Linguistics
Language:English
Date:February 2016
Deposited On:02 Feb 2016 14:52
Last Modified:11 Apr 2016 14:14
Publisher:De Gruyter
Volume:61(1)
ISSN:0044-3506 / 2196-7016

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 73kB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations