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Implementation of a spike-based perceptron learning rule using TiO2-x memristors


Mostafa, Hesham; Khiat, Ali; Serb, Alexander; Mayr, Christian G; Indiveri, Giacomo; Prodromakis, Themistoklis (2015). Implementation of a spike-based perceptron learning rule using TiO2-x memristors. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 9(357):online.

Abstract

Synaptic plasticity plays a crucial role in allowing neural networks to learn and adapt to various input environments. Neuromorphic systems need to implement plastic synapses to obtain basic "cognitive" capabilities such as learning. One promising and scalable approach for implementing neuromorphic synapses is to use nano-scale memristors as synaptic elements. In this paper we propose a hybrid CMOS-memristor system comprising CMOS neurons interconnected through TiO2-x memristors, and spike-based learning circuits that modulate the conductance of the memristive synapse elements according to a spike-based Perceptron plasticity rule. We highlight a number of advantages for using this spike-based plasticity rule as compared to other forms of spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) rules. We provide experimental proof-of-concept results with two silicon neurons connected through a memristive synapse that show how the CMOS plasticity circuits can induce stable changes in memristor conductances, giving rise to increased synaptic strength after a potentiation episode and to decreased strength after a depression episode.

Abstract

Synaptic plasticity plays a crucial role in allowing neural networks to learn and adapt to various input environments. Neuromorphic systems need to implement plastic synapses to obtain basic "cognitive" capabilities such as learning. One promising and scalable approach for implementing neuromorphic synapses is to use nano-scale memristors as synaptic elements. In this paper we propose a hybrid CMOS-memristor system comprising CMOS neurons interconnected through TiO2-x memristors, and spike-based learning circuits that modulate the conductance of the memristive synapse elements according to a spike-based Perceptron plasticity rule. We highlight a number of advantages for using this spike-based plasticity rule as compared to other forms of spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) rules. We provide experimental proof-of-concept results with two silicon neurons connected through a memristive synapse that show how the CMOS plasticity circuits can induce stable changes in memristor conductances, giving rise to increased synaptic strength after a potentiation episode and to decreased strength after a depression episode.

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3 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Neuroinformatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:11 Feb 2016 09:27
Last Modified:26 Oct 2016 13:15
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
Series Name:Frontiers in neuroscience
ISSN:1662-453X
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2015.00357
PubMed ID:26483629

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