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Female-biased dispersal in the solitarily foraging slender mongoose, Galerella sanguinea, in the Kalahari


Graw, B; Lindholm, A K; Manser, M B (2016). Female-biased dispersal in the solitarily foraging slender mongoose, Galerella sanguinea, in the Kalahari. Animal Behaviour, 111:69-78.

Abstract

Sex-biased dispersal is common in most mammals, but a female bias is less so and exceptionally rare in solitary mammals. Here we present genetic and observational evidence for strong female-biased dispersal in a solitary foraging small carnivore, the slender mongoose. We suggest that females benefit from dispersal by avoiding kin competition over local resources and inbreeding, while males can benefit from philopatry through kin cooperation leading to an increased success in female defence. The comparison between our observations and those of a previous study in Tanzania suggest that there is ecologically influenced flexibility in dispersal patterns within this species, influencing sex-specific benefits of dispersal and philopatry. Comparing our results with those on the closely related, more social mongoose species in which both sexes commonly disperse suggests that dispersal patterns are linked to a species' social system by the opportunity, or lack of it, in philopatry to obtain unrelated mating partners and gain indirect fitness benefits.

Abstract

Sex-biased dispersal is common in most mammals, but a female bias is less so and exceptionally rare in solitary mammals. Here we present genetic and observational evidence for strong female-biased dispersal in a solitary foraging small carnivore, the slender mongoose. We suggest that females benefit from dispersal by avoiding kin competition over local resources and inbreeding, while males can benefit from philopatry through kin cooperation leading to an increased success in female defence. The comparison between our observations and those of a previous study in Tanzania suggest that there is ecologically influenced flexibility in dispersal patterns within this species, influencing sex-specific benefits of dispersal and philopatry. Comparing our results with those on the closely related, more social mongoose species in which both sexes commonly disperse suggests that dispersal patterns are linked to a species' social system by the opportunity, or lack of it, in philopatry to obtain unrelated mating partners and gain indirect fitness benefits.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:24 Feb 2016 13:08
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 20:08
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0003-3472
Funders:University of Zürich
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.09.026

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