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Identification of candidate genes for controlling development of the basilar pons by differential display PCR.


Gesemann, Matthias; Litwack, E David; Yee, Kathleen T; Christen, Urs; O'Leary, Dennis D M (2001). Identification of candidate genes for controlling development of the basilar pons by differential display PCR. Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, 18(1):1-12.

Abstract

The basilar pons, a major hindbrain nucleus involved in sensory-motor integration, has become a model system for studying long-distance neuronal migration, axon-target recognition by collateral branching, and the formation of patterned axonal projections. To identify genes potentially involved in these developmental events, we have performed a differential display PCR screen comparing RNA isolated from the developing basilar pons with RNA obtained from developing cerebellum and olfactory bulb, as well as the mature basilar pons. Using 400 different combinations of primers, we screened more than 11,000 labeled DNA fragments and identified 201 that exhibited higher expression in the basilar pons than in the control tissues. From these, 138 distinct gene fragments were cloned. The differential expression of a large subset of these fragments was confirmed using RNase protection assays. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that the expression of many of these genes is limited to the basilar pons and only a few other brain regions, suggesting that they may play specific roles in pontine development.

The basilar pons, a major hindbrain nucleus involved in sensory-motor integration, has become a model system for studying long-distance neuronal migration, axon-target recognition by collateral branching, and the formation of patterned axonal projections. To identify genes potentially involved in these developmental events, we have performed a differential display PCR screen comparing RNA isolated from the developing basilar pons with RNA obtained from developing cerebellum and olfactory bulb, as well as the mature basilar pons. Using 400 different combinations of primers, we screened more than 11,000 labeled DNA fragments and identified 201 that exhibited higher expression in the basilar pons than in the control tissues. From these, 138 distinct gene fragments were cloned. The differential expression of a large subset of these fragments was confirmed using RNase protection assays. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that the expression of many of these genes is limited to the basilar pons and only a few other brain regions, suggesting that they may play specific roles in pontine development.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Brain Research Institute
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2001
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:12
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1044-7431
Publisher DOI:10.1006/mcne.2001.0996
PubMed ID:11461149
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-123

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