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Inter-hemispheric connectivity in the fusiform gyrus supports memory consolidation for faces


Geiger, Maximilian J; O Gorman Tuura, Ruth; Klaver, Peter (2016). Inter-hemispheric connectivity in the fusiform gyrus supports memory consolidation for faces. European Journal of Neuroscience, 43(9):1137-1145.

Abstract

In this study we investigated how changes of functional connectivity over time accompanies consolidation of face memories. Based on previous research we hypothesised that particularly connectivity changes in networks initially active during face perception and face encoding would be associated with individual recognition memory performance. Resting-state functional connectivity was examined shortly before, shortly after and about forty minutes after incidental learning of faces. Memory performance was assessed in a surprise recognition test shortly after the last resting-state session. Results reveal that memory performance related connectivity between the left fusiform face area and other brain areas gradually changed over the course of the experiment. Specifically, the increase in connectivity with the contralateral fusiform gyrus, the hippocampus, the amygdala and the inferior frontal gyrus correlated with recognition memory performance. Since especially the increase in connectivity in the two final resting-state sessions was associated with memory performance the present results demonstrate that memory formation is not restricted to the incidental learning phase but continues and increases in the following forty minutes. We discuss that particularly the delayed increase in inter-hemisphere connectivity between the left and right fusiform gyrus is an indicator for memory formation and consolidation processes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Abstract

In this study we investigated how changes of functional connectivity over time accompanies consolidation of face memories. Based on previous research we hypothesised that particularly connectivity changes in networks initially active during face perception and face encoding would be associated with individual recognition memory performance. Resting-state functional connectivity was examined shortly before, shortly after and about forty minutes after incidental learning of faces. Memory performance was assessed in a surprise recognition test shortly after the last resting-state session. Results reveal that memory performance related connectivity between the left fusiform face area and other brain areas gradually changed over the course of the experiment. Specifically, the increase in connectivity with the contralateral fusiform gyrus, the hippocampus, the amygdala and the inferior frontal gyrus correlated with recognition memory performance. Since especially the increase in connectivity in the two final resting-state sessions was associated with memory performance the present results demonstrate that memory formation is not restricted to the incidental learning phase but continues and increases in the following forty minutes. We discuss that particularly the delayed increase in inter-hemisphere connectivity between the left and right fusiform gyrus is an indicator for memory formation and consolidation processes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:4 February 2016
Deposited On:24 Feb 2016 11:02
Last Modified:27 Apr 2016 01:04
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0953-816X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/ejn.13197
PubMed ID:26844811

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