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Reporting knee meniscal tears: technical aspects, typical pitfalls and how to avoid them


Bolog, Nicolae V; Andreisek, Gustav (2016). Reporting knee meniscal tears: technical aspects, typical pitfalls and how to avoid them. Insights into Imaging, 7(3):385-398.

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most accurate imaging technique in the diagnosis of meniscal lesions and represents a standard tool in knee evaluation. MRI plays a critical role in influencing the treatment decision and enables information that would obviate unnecessary surgery including diagnostic arthroscopy. An accurate interpretation of the knee depends on several factors, starting with technical aspects including radiofrequency coils, imaging protocol and magnetic field strength. The use of dedicated high-resolution orthopaedic coils with a different number of integrated elements is mandatory in order to ensure high homogeneity of the signal and high-resolution images. The clinical imaging protocol of the knee includes different MRI sequences with high-spatial resolution in all orientations: sagittal, coronal, and axial. Usually, the slice thickness is 3 mm or less, even with standard two-dimensional fast spin echo sequences. A common potential reason for pitfalls and errors of interpretation is the unawareness of the normal tibial attachments and capsular attachment of the menisci. Complete description of meniscal tears implies that the radiologist should be aware of the patterns and the complex classification of the lesions.

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most accurate imaging technique in the diagnosis of meniscal lesions and represents a standard tool in knee evaluation. MRI plays a critical role in influencing the treatment decision and enables information that would obviate unnecessary surgery including diagnostic arthroscopy. An accurate interpretation of the knee depends on several factors, starting with technical aspects including radiofrequency coils, imaging protocol and magnetic field strength. The use of dedicated high-resolution orthopaedic coils with a different number of integrated elements is mandatory in order to ensure high homogeneity of the signal and high-resolution images. The clinical imaging protocol of the knee includes different MRI sequences with high-spatial resolution in all orientations: sagittal, coronal, and axial. Usually, the slice thickness is 3 mm or less, even with standard two-dimensional fast spin echo sequences. A common potential reason for pitfalls and errors of interpretation is the unawareness of the normal tibial attachments and capsular attachment of the menisci. Complete description of meniscal tears implies that the radiologist should be aware of the patterns and the complex classification of the lesions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Knee, Magnetic resonance imaging, Menisci, Anatomy, Magnetic fields
Date:16 February 2016
Deposited On:29 Feb 2016 16:08
Last Modified:25 May 2016 01:03
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1869-4101
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s13244-016-0472-y
PubMed ID:26883139

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Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

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