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Inhalation anesthesia of rats: influence of the fraction of inspired oxygen on limb ischemia/reperfusion injury


Zhang, S; Duehrkop, C; Plock, J A; Rieben, R (2016). Inhalation anesthesia of rats: influence of the fraction of inspired oxygen on limb ischemia/reperfusion injury. Laboratory Animals, 50(3):185-197.

Abstract

Inhalation anesthesia with isoflurane is a well-established and safe method used in small laboratory animals. In most cases oxygen is used as a carrier gas for isoflurane, but room air or mixtures of oxygen with air or nitrous oxide are also being used. Anesthesia is therefore administered using different fractions of inspired oxygen (FiO2), and this may have consequences for the outcome of experiments. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of FiO2 on rat hind limb ischemia/reperfusion injury and to refine the used inhalation anesthesia. Male Wistar rats were subjected to 3.5 h of ischemia and 2 h of reperfusion, and divided into three groups according to FiO2 in the O2/air/isoflurane anesthesia gas mixture: 40%, 60%, and 100% O2. Normal, healthy rats were used as controls. Muscle edema and creatine kinase MM, a marker for myocyte necrosis, were significantly increased with 40% FiO2 as compared with 100% FiO2 (P < 0.05). Partial pressure of oxygen, oxygen saturation, and oxyhemoglobin were significantly higher in the 100% O2 group as compared with 40% O2. No significant differences were detected for other parameters, such as the oxidative stress markers malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase. We conclude that a refined inhalation anesthesia setting using 40% FiO2, reflecting more or less the clinical situation, leads to a more severe and more physiologically relevant reperfusion injury than higher FiO2. Oxidative stress did not correlate with FiO2 and seemed to have no influence on reperfusion injury.

Abstract

Inhalation anesthesia with isoflurane is a well-established and safe method used in small laboratory animals. In most cases oxygen is used as a carrier gas for isoflurane, but room air or mixtures of oxygen with air or nitrous oxide are also being used. Anesthesia is therefore administered using different fractions of inspired oxygen (FiO2), and this may have consequences for the outcome of experiments. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of FiO2 on rat hind limb ischemia/reperfusion injury and to refine the used inhalation anesthesia. Male Wistar rats were subjected to 3.5 h of ischemia and 2 h of reperfusion, and divided into three groups according to FiO2 in the O2/air/isoflurane anesthesia gas mixture: 40%, 60%, and 100% O2. Normal, healthy rats were used as controls. Muscle edema and creatine kinase MM, a marker for myocyte necrosis, were significantly increased with 40% FiO2 as compared with 100% FiO2 (P < 0.05). Partial pressure of oxygen, oxygen saturation, and oxyhemoglobin were significantly higher in the 100% O2 group as compared with 40% O2. No significant differences were detected for other parameters, such as the oxidative stress markers malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase. We conclude that a refined inhalation anesthesia setting using 40% FiO2, reflecting more or less the clinical situation, leads to a more severe and more physiologically relevant reperfusion injury than higher FiO2. Oxidative stress did not correlate with FiO2 and seemed to have no influence on reperfusion injury.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reconstructive Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:22 Mar 2016 14:27
Last Modified:13 May 2016 01:04
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:0023-6772
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/0023677215604531
PubMed ID:26345513

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