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Retrospective evaluation of postoperative nasotracheal tubes for oxygen supplementation in dogs following surgery for brachycephalic syndrome: 36 cases (2003-2007)


Senn, David; Sigrist, Nadja; Forterre, Franck; Howard, Judith; Spreng, David (2011). Retrospective evaluation of postoperative nasotracheal tubes for oxygen supplementation in dogs following surgery for brachycephalic syndrome: 36 cases (2003-2007). Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care, 21(3):261-267.

Abstract

Objective: To assess the utility of nasotracheal tubes in postoperative oxygen supplementation in dogs following corrective surgery for brachycephalic syndrome.
Design: Retrospective study 2003–2007.
Setting: University teaching hospital.
Animals: Thirty-six client-owned dogs that underwent corrective surgery for brachycephalic syndrome.
Interventions: None.
Measurements and Main Results: Medical records were reviewed for animals that underwent surgical interventions for brachycephalic syndrome including palatoplasty, ventriculectomy, and rhinoplasty. Data collected included signalment, presenting complaints, analgesic and surgical interventions, type of supplemental oxygen therapy, complications and mortality occurring during hospitalization. A nasotracheal tube (NTT) was placed in 20 dogs at the end of surgery; 16 dogs received other forms of oxygen supplementation (8) or no oxygen supplementation (8) during recovery. The total number of postoperative complications was similar in both groups (8/20 dogs with NTTs and 7/16 in those without NTTs). However, respiratory distress was observed in 5 dogs without NTTs but was not observed in any dog while an NTT was in place. One dog in each group died postoperatively.
Conclusion: Placement of an NTT was found to be easy and may offer benefit in dogs with brachycephalic syndrome as a noninvasive means of delivering oxygen. The use of NTT may minimize severe postoperative morbidity, in particular by reducing postoperative respiratory distress.

Abstract

Objective: To assess the utility of nasotracheal tubes in postoperative oxygen supplementation in dogs following corrective surgery for brachycephalic syndrome.
Design: Retrospective study 2003–2007.
Setting: University teaching hospital.
Animals: Thirty-six client-owned dogs that underwent corrective surgery for brachycephalic syndrome.
Interventions: None.
Measurements and Main Results: Medical records were reviewed for animals that underwent surgical interventions for brachycephalic syndrome including palatoplasty, ventriculectomy, and rhinoplasty. Data collected included signalment, presenting complaints, analgesic and surgical interventions, type of supplemental oxygen therapy, complications and mortality occurring during hospitalization. A nasotracheal tube (NTT) was placed in 20 dogs at the end of surgery; 16 dogs received other forms of oxygen supplementation (8) or no oxygen supplementation (8) during recovery. The total number of postoperative complications was similar in both groups (8/20 dogs with NTTs and 7/16 in those without NTTs). However, respiratory distress was observed in 5 dogs without NTTs but was not observed in any dog while an NTT was in place. One dog in each group died postoperatively.
Conclusion: Placement of an NTT was found to be easy and may offer benefit in dogs with brachycephalic syndrome as a noninvasive means of delivering oxygen. The use of NTT may minimize severe postoperative morbidity, in particular by reducing postoperative respiratory distress.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Uncontrolled Keywords:canine;complications;postoperative;respiratory tract surgery
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:22 Mar 2016 12:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 20:12
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1476-4431
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-4431.2011.00612.x
PubMed ID:21631712

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