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Don't think, just feel the music: individuals with strong Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer effects rely less on model-based reinforcement learning


Sebold, Miriam; Schad, Daniel J; Nebe, Stephan; Garbusow, Maria; Jünger, Elisabeth; Kroemer, Nils B; Kathmann, Norbert; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Smolka, Michael N; Rapp, Michael A; Heinz, Andreas; Huys, Quentin J M (2016). Don't think, just feel the music: individuals with strong Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer effects rely less on model-based reinforcement learning. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 28(7):985-995.

Abstract

Behavioral choice can be characterized along two axes. One axis distinguishes reflexive, model-free systems that slowly accumulate values through experience and a model-based system that uses knowledge to reason prospectively. The second axis distinguishes Pavlovian valuation of stimuli from instrumental valuation of actions or stimulus-action pairs. This results in four values and many possible interactions between them, with important consequences for accounts of individual variation. We here explored whether individual variation along one axis was related to individual variation along the other. Specifically, we asked whether individuals' balance between model-based and model-free learning was related to their tendency to show Pavlovian interferences with instrumental decisions. In two independent samples with a total of 243 participants, Pavlovian-instrumental transfer effects were negatively correlated with the strength of model-based reasoning in a two-step task. This suggests a potential common underlying substrate predisposing individuals to both have strong Pavlovian interference and be less model-based and provides a framework within which to interpret the observation of both effects in addiction.

Abstract

Behavioral choice can be characterized along two axes. One axis distinguishes reflexive, model-free systems that slowly accumulate values through experience and a model-based system that uses knowledge to reason prospectively. The second axis distinguishes Pavlovian valuation of stimuli from instrumental valuation of actions or stimulus-action pairs. This results in four values and many possible interactions between them, with important consequences for accounts of individual variation. We here explored whether individual variation along one axis was related to individual variation along the other. Specifically, we asked whether individuals' balance between model-based and model-free learning was related to their tendency to show Pavlovian interferences with instrumental decisions. In two independent samples with a total of 243 participants, Pavlovian-instrumental transfer effects were negatively correlated with the strength of model-based reasoning in a two-step task. This suggests a potential common underlying substrate predisposing individuals to both have strong Pavlovian interference and be less model-based and provides a framework within which to interpret the observation of both effects in addiction.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:4 March 2016
Deposited On:29 Apr 2016 16:55
Last Modified:04 Jun 2016 00:00
Publisher:MIT Press
ISSN:0898-929X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1162/jocn_a_00945
Official URL:https://www.tnu.ethz.ch/fileadmin/user_upload/documents/Publications/2016/2016_Sebold_Schad_Nebe_Garbusow_Juenger_Kroemer_Kathmann_Zimmermann_Smolka_Rapp_Heinz_Huys.pdf
PubMed ID:26942321

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