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Mismatch negativity: Alterations in adults from the general population who report subclinical psychotic symptoms


Döring, C; Müller, M; Hagenmuller, F; Ajdacic-Gross, V; Haker, H; Kawohl, W; Rössler, W; Heekeren, Karsten (2016). Mismatch negativity: Alterations in adults from the general population who report subclinical psychotic symptoms. European Psychiatry, 34:9-16.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Deficits of mismatch negativity (MMN) in schizophrenia and individuals at risk for psychosis have been replicated many times. Several studies have also demonstrated the occurrence of subclinical psychotic symptoms within the general population. However, none has yet investigated MMN in individuals from the general population who report subclinical psychotic symptoms.
METHODS: The MMN to duration-, frequency-, and intensity deviants was recorded in 217 nonclinical individuals classified into a control group (n=72) and three subclinical groups: paranoid (n=44), psychotic (n=51), and mixed paranoid-psychotic (n=50). Amplitudes of MMN at frontocentral electrodes were referenced to average. Based on a three-source model of MMN generation, we conducted an MMN source analysis and compared the amplitudes of surface electrodes and sources among groups.
RESULTS: We found no significant differences in MMN amplitudes of surface electrodes. However, significant differences in MMN generation among the four groups were revealed at the frontal source for duration-deviant stimuli (P=0.01). We also detected a trend-level difference (P=0.05) in MMN activity among those groups for frequency deviants at the frontal source.
CONCLUSIONS: Individuals from the general population who report psychotic symptoms are a heterogeneous group. However, alterations exist in their frontal MMN activity. This increased activity might be an indicator of more sensitive perception regarding changes in the environment for individuals with subclinical psychotic symptoms.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Deficits of mismatch negativity (MMN) in schizophrenia and individuals at risk for psychosis have been replicated many times. Several studies have also demonstrated the occurrence of subclinical psychotic symptoms within the general population. However, none has yet investigated MMN in individuals from the general population who report subclinical psychotic symptoms.
METHODS: The MMN to duration-, frequency-, and intensity deviants was recorded in 217 nonclinical individuals classified into a control group (n=72) and three subclinical groups: paranoid (n=44), psychotic (n=51), and mixed paranoid-psychotic (n=50). Amplitudes of MMN at frontocentral electrodes were referenced to average. Based on a three-source model of MMN generation, we conducted an MMN source analysis and compared the amplitudes of surface electrodes and sources among groups.
RESULTS: We found no significant differences in MMN amplitudes of surface electrodes. However, significant differences in MMN generation among the four groups were revealed at the frontal source for duration-deviant stimuli (P=0.01). We also detected a trend-level difference (P=0.05) in MMN activity among those groups for frequency deviants at the frontal source.
CONCLUSIONS: Individuals from the general population who report psychotic symptoms are a heterogeneous group. However, alterations exist in their frontal MMN activity. This increased activity might be an indicator of more sensitive perception regarding changes in the environment for individuals with subclinical psychotic symptoms.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Biomarker; EEG; General population; Mismatch negativity; Psychosis; Source analysis
Language:English
Date:April 2016
Deposited On:29 Apr 2016 17:20
Last Modified:29 Apr 2016 17:20
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0924-9338
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eurpsy.2016.01.001
Official URL:http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924933816000031
PubMed ID:26928341

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