UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Record books do not capture population trends in horn length of bighorn sheep


Festa-Bianchet, Marco; Schindler, Susanne; Pelletier, Fanie (2015). Record books do not capture population trends in horn length of bighorn sheep. Wildlife Society Bulletin (Online), 39(4):746-750.

Abstract

Many agencies and researchers use data from harvested animals to study temporal trends in phenotype. For large mammals, complete harvest records are typically only available for the past few decades, but records of the largest trophies have been collected for over a century. To examine whether record books and data from male bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) harvested under a minimum-curl regulation could detect temporal trends in horn length, we simulated populations of trophy-harvested male bighorn sheep where horn length was modeled to increase, remain stable, and decrease over time. All populations experienced a simulated harvest based on a minimum horn length, but only horns in the longest 5% of the initial distribution were entered in a fictional record book. We then assessed whether monitoring of harvested and “record” males detected temporal trends. Data from selective harvest underestimated declines and initially underestimated increases, but qualitatively detected both trends. Record-book entries, however, severely underestimated increases and did not detect declines, suggesting that they should not be used to monitor population trends. When these biases are taken into account, complete trophy harvest records can provide useful biological information.

Abstract

Many agencies and researchers use data from harvested animals to study temporal trends in phenotype. For large mammals, complete harvest records are typically only available for the past few decades, but records of the largest trophies have been collected for over a century. To examine whether record books and data from male bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) harvested under a minimum-curl regulation could detect temporal trends in horn length, we simulated populations of trophy-harvested male bighorn sheep where horn length was modeled to increase, remain stable, and decrease over time. All populations experienced a simulated harvest based on a minimum horn length, but only horns in the longest 5% of the initial distribution were entered in a fictional record book. We then assessed whether monitoring of harvested and “record” males detected temporal trends. Data from selective harvest underestimated declines and initially underestimated increases, but qualitatively detected both trends. Record-book entries, however, severely underestimated increases and did not detect declines, suggesting that they should not be used to monitor population trends. When these biases are taken into account, complete trophy harvest records can provide useful biological information.

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 11 May 2016
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:11 May 2016 14:02
Last Modified:11 May 2016 14:02
Publisher:John Wiley
ISSN:1938-5463
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/wsb.597

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 139kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations