UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Private health insurance in developing countries


Pauly, Mark V; Zweifel, Peter; Scheffler, Richard M; Preker, Alexander S; Bassett, M (2006). Private health insurance in developing countries. Health Affairs, 25(2):369-379.

Abstract

A joint Wharton School–World Bank conference called attention to the high proportions of medical care spending paid out of pocket in most developing countries. One of the reasons for this, attendees said, is the problem in such economies of generating high tax revenues in a nondistortive way. Since people are paying out of pocket, they should be able to afford some private insurance that can spread the risk of above-average out-of-pocket payments. The potential efficiency gains from greater use of voluntary private insurance seem large, but there are a number of possible impediments to the emergence of such insurance.

A joint Wharton School–World Bank conference called attention to the high proportions of medical care spending paid out of pocket in most developing countries. One of the reasons for this, attendees said, is the problem in such economies of generating high tax revenues in a nondistortive way. Since people are paying out of pocket, they should be able to afford some private insurance that can spread the risk of above-average out-of-pocket payments. The potential efficiency gains from greater use of voluntary private insurance seem large, but there are a number of possible impediments to the emergence of such insurance.

Citations

32 citations in Web of Science®
38 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:17
Publisher:Project Hope/Health Affairs
ISSN:0278-2715
Publisher DOI:10.1377/hlthaff.25.2.369

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations