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Symptom change trajectories during inpatient psychotherapy in routine care and their associations with long-term outcomes


Melchior, Hanne; Schulz, Holger; Kriston, Levente; Hergert, Anika; Hofreuter-Gätgens, Kerstin; Bergelt, Corinna; Morfeld, Matthias; Koch, Uwe; Watzke, Birgit (2016). Symptom change trajectories during inpatient psychotherapy in routine care and their associations with long-term outcomes. Psychiatry Research, 238:228-235.

Abstract

This study examined symptom change trajectories during inpatient psychotherapy and the association of these changes with long-term outcomes. In an observational multicenter study, weekly measurements of symptom severity were performed during inpatient treatment and 6 months after discharge. The symptom severity was measured using the 18-item scale of the Hamburg Modules for the Assessment of Psychosocial Health. The sample included 576 inpatients (mean age: 43.9 years; 77.6% female; main diagnoses: depressive (57.2%), adjustment (15.8%), anxiety (7.4%), and eating disorders (7.2%); mean treatment duration: 42.0 days). With empirically and clinically informed growth mixture models four subgroups of symptom change were revealed: gradual response (71%), early response (9%), delayed response (5%), and nonresponse (11%). Particularly low educational level, non-employment and chronic disorders were associated with unfavorable symptom courses (non- and delayed response). Long-term outcomes differed systematically across subgroups (p<0.001; η(2)=0.165). The patients who responded early presented the highest rates of clinically significant improvement (43.9%) from admission to follow-up. Nearly all of these patients (92.7%) showed reliable improvement. Due to the high association of symptom change trajectories with long-term outcomes, results may contribute to interventions that are tailored to the needs of patients and may foster longer lasting therapeutic effectiveness.

Abstract

This study examined symptom change trajectories during inpatient psychotherapy and the association of these changes with long-term outcomes. In an observational multicenter study, weekly measurements of symptom severity were performed during inpatient treatment and 6 months after discharge. The symptom severity was measured using the 18-item scale of the Hamburg Modules for the Assessment of Psychosocial Health. The sample included 576 inpatients (mean age: 43.9 years; 77.6% female; main diagnoses: depressive (57.2%), adjustment (15.8%), anxiety (7.4%), and eating disorders (7.2%); mean treatment duration: 42.0 days). With empirically and clinically informed growth mixture models four subgroups of symptom change were revealed: gradual response (71%), early response (9%), delayed response (5%), and nonresponse (11%). Particularly low educational level, non-employment and chronic disorders were associated with unfavorable symptom courses (non- and delayed response). Long-term outcomes differed systematically across subgroups (p<0.001; η(2)=0.165). The patients who responded early presented the highest rates of clinically significant improvement (43.9%) from admission to follow-up. Nearly all of these patients (92.7%) showed reliable improvement. Due to the high association of symptom change trajectories with long-term outcomes, results may contribute to interventions that are tailored to the needs of patients and may foster longer lasting therapeutic effectiveness.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:30 April 2016
Deposited On:18 May 2016 13:41
Last Modified:19 May 2016 12:08
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0165-1781
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2016.02.046
PubMed ID:27086238

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