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Prevalence and determinants of chronic kidney disease in the Swiss population


Forni Ogna, Valentina; Ogna, Adam; Ponte, Belen; Gabutti, Luca; Binet, Isabelle; Conen, David; Erne, Paul; Gallino, Augusto; Guessous, Idris; Hayoz, Daniel; Muggli, Franco; Paccaud, Fred; Péchère-Bertchi, Antoinette; Suter, Paolo M; Bochud, Murielle; Burnier, Michel (2016). Prevalence and determinants of chronic kidney disease in the Swiss population. Swiss Medical Weekly, 146:w14313.

Abstract

QUESTIONS UNDER STUDY: The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing worldwide, corresponding to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The latest study on prevalence of CKD involving the three linguistic regions of Switzerland dates back to 2002-2003 and definitions have changed since then. We aimed to assess the current prevalence and determinants of CKD in the Swiss general population.
METHODS: We analysed the data of 1353 participants from a cross-sectional population-based survey performed in 2010-2012 in the three linguistic regions of Switzerland. The prevalence of CKD and the derived cardiovascular risk categories were assessed according to the Kidney Disease - Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) 2012 classification, using estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR; CKD-Epidemiological Collaboration equation) and albuminuria level. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyse factors associated with CKD.
RESULTS: We included 660 men and 693 women, equally distributed in four age categories (15-29, 30-44, 45-59 and over 60 years). The overall prevalence of CKD was 10.4%. The prevalence in the low, moderate, high and very high risk KDIGO categories were 89.6%, 8.4%, 1.6% and 0.5%, respectively. The prevalence of CKD was similar in all linguistic regions. In multivariate analysis, female gender, older age, diabetes and uric acid were independently associated with CKD in persons ≥45 y. In younger participants, diabetes and lower educational level were associated with CKD.
CONCLUSIONS: In the general Swiss population, CKD affects one in ten adults. Subjects older than 60 years, as well as patients with diabetes and hypertension, show a high prevalence of CKD. Systematic screening may be recommended in this population.

QUESTIONS UNDER STUDY: The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing worldwide, corresponding to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The latest study on prevalence of CKD involving the three linguistic regions of Switzerland dates back to 2002-2003 and definitions have changed since then. We aimed to assess the current prevalence and determinants of CKD in the Swiss general population.
METHODS: We analysed the data of 1353 participants from a cross-sectional population-based survey performed in 2010-2012 in the three linguistic regions of Switzerland. The prevalence of CKD and the derived cardiovascular risk categories were assessed according to the Kidney Disease - Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) 2012 classification, using estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR; CKD-Epidemiological Collaboration equation) and albuminuria level. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyse factors associated with CKD.
RESULTS: We included 660 men and 693 women, equally distributed in four age categories (15-29, 30-44, 45-59 and over 60 years). The overall prevalence of CKD was 10.4%. The prevalence in the low, moderate, high and very high risk KDIGO categories were 89.6%, 8.4%, 1.6% and 0.5%, respectively. The prevalence of CKD was similar in all linguistic regions. In multivariate analysis, female gender, older age, diabetes and uric acid were independently associated with CKD in persons ≥45 y. In younger participants, diabetes and lower educational level were associated with CKD.
CONCLUSIONS: In the general Swiss population, CKD affects one in ten adults. Subjects older than 60 years, as well as patients with diabetes and hypertension, show a high prevalence of CKD. Systematic screening may be recommended in this population.

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Contributors:Service of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland, Department of Internal Medicine and Nephrology, Ospedale La Carità, Locarno, Switzerland, Division of Chronic Disease, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland, Service of Nephrology, Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland, Service of Nephrology/Transplantation Medicine, Kantonsspital, St. Gallen, Switzerland, Department of Medicine, University Hospital Basel, Switzerland, Hypertension Centre, Luzern, Switzerland, Cardiology Department, Ospedale San Giovanni, Bellinzona, Switzerland, Unit of Population Epidemiology, Division of Primary Care Medicine, Department of Community Medicine, Primary Care and Emergency Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland, Department of Internal Medicine and Angiology, Hôpital Cantonal, Fribourg, Switzerland, Internal Medicine Praxis, Vezia, Switzerland, Unit of Hypertension, Departments of Specialties of Medicine and Community Medicine and Primary Care and Emergency Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:6 May 2016
Deposited On:25 May 2016 17:17
Last Modified:26 May 2016 14:26
Publisher:EMH Swiss Medical Publishers
ISSN:0036-7672
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4414/smw.2016.14313. eCollection 2016
PubMed ID:27152492
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-124183

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