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Effect of CPAP Withdrawal on myocardial perfusion in OSA: A randomized controlled trial


Schwarz, Esther I; Schlatzer, Christian; Stehli, Julia; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Bloch, Konrad E; Stradling, John R; Kohler, Malcolm (2016). Effect of CPAP Withdrawal on myocardial perfusion in OSA: A randomized controlled trial. Respirology, 21(6):1126-1133.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is highly prevalent and associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular events. Endothelial dysfunction is the proposed causative mechanism. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is presumed to improve cardiovascular outcome in OSA. CPAP withdrawal was recently shown to lead to peripheral endothelial dysfunction. However, it is not known whether short-term CPAP withdrawal reduces myocardial perfusion in OSA. METHODS In this double-blind randomized controlled study, 45 patients with moderate to severe OSA previously adherent to CPAP were assigned to either subtherapeutic or continuing therapeutic CPAP for 2 weeks. The primary outcome was adenosine-induced myocardial blood flow (MBF) as a measure of endothelial function, assessed by (13) N-ammonia positron emission tomography. Secondary outcomes were measures of dermal and renal microvascular function, morning blood pressure (BP) and heart rate. RESULTS Despite return of OSA associated with significant increases in BP (+9.1 mm Hg, 95% CI +4.9 to +13.4 mm Hg, P < 0.001) and heart rate (+9.6 bpm, 95% confidence interval (CI) +4.6 to +14.6 bpm, P < 0.001), CPAP withdrawal had no significant effect on maximal myocardial perfusion capacity (hyperaemic MBF -0.01 ml/min/g, 95% CI -0.33 to +0.24 ml/min/g, P = 0.91), nor renal and dermal microvascular function. CONCLUSION In patients with OSA, a short-term CPAP withdrawal does not lead to detectable impairment of coronary endothelial function, as has been demonstrated in the brachial artery, despite a clinically relevant increase in BP of nearly 10 mm Hg. There was also no evidence of an impairment of renal or dermal microvascular function.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is highly prevalent and associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular events. Endothelial dysfunction is the proposed causative mechanism. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is presumed to improve cardiovascular outcome in OSA. CPAP withdrawal was recently shown to lead to peripheral endothelial dysfunction. However, it is not known whether short-term CPAP withdrawal reduces myocardial perfusion in OSA. METHODS In this double-blind randomized controlled study, 45 patients with moderate to severe OSA previously adherent to CPAP were assigned to either subtherapeutic or continuing therapeutic CPAP for 2 weeks. The primary outcome was adenosine-induced myocardial blood flow (MBF) as a measure of endothelial function, assessed by (13) N-ammonia positron emission tomography. Secondary outcomes were measures of dermal and renal microvascular function, morning blood pressure (BP) and heart rate. RESULTS Despite return of OSA associated with significant increases in BP (+9.1 mm Hg, 95% CI +4.9 to +13.4 mm Hg, P < 0.001) and heart rate (+9.6 bpm, 95% confidence interval (CI) +4.6 to +14.6 bpm, P < 0.001), CPAP withdrawal had no significant effect on maximal myocardial perfusion capacity (hyperaemic MBF -0.01 ml/min/g, 95% CI -0.33 to +0.24 ml/min/g, P = 0.91), nor renal and dermal microvascular function. CONCLUSION In patients with OSA, a short-term CPAP withdrawal does not lead to detectable impairment of coronary endothelial function, as has been demonstrated in the brachial artery, despite a clinically relevant increase in BP of nearly 10 mm Hg. There was also no evidence of an impairment of renal or dermal microvascular function.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nuclear Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:20 April 2016
Deposited On:03 Jun 2016 09:20
Last Modified:16 Jul 2016 01:03
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1323-7799
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/resp.12798
PubMed ID:27096358

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