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Antioxidants in adipose tissue and risk of myocardial infarction: the EURAMIC Study


Kardinaal, A F; Kok, F J; Ringstad, J; Gomez-Aracena, J; Mazaev, V P; Kohlmeier, L; Martin, Blaise C; Aro, A; Kark, J D; Delgado-Rodriguez, M (1993). Antioxidants in adipose tissue and risk of myocardial infarction: the EURAMIC Study. Lancet, 342(8884):1379-1384.

Abstract

Laboratory and epidemiological studies suggest that the antioxidants, vitamin E and beta-carotene, protect against coronary heart disease. In a European multicentre case-control study alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene concentrations were measured in adipose-tissue samples collected in 1991-92 from 683 people with acute myocardial infarction and 727 controls. Mean adipose-tissue beta-carotene concentration was 0.35 microgram/g in cases and 0.42 in controls, with age-adjusted and centre-adjusted mean difference 0.07 microgram/g (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.04-0.10). Mean alpha-tocopherol concentrations were 193 micrograms/g and 192 micrograms/g for cases and controls, respectively. The age-adjusted and centre-adjusted odds ratio for risk of myocardial infarction in the lowest quintile of beta-carotene as compared with the highest was 2.62 (95% CI 1.79-3.83). Additional control for body-mass index and smoking reduced the odds ratio to 1.78 (95% CI 1.17-2.71); other established risk factors did not substantially alter this ratio. The increased risk was mainly confined to current smokers: the multivariate odds ratio in the lowest beta-carotene quintile in smokers was 2.39 (95% CI 1.35-4.25), whereas it was 1.07 for people who had never smoked. A low alpha-tocopherol concentration was not associated with risk of myocardial infarction. Our results support the hypothesis that high beta-carotene concentrations within the normal range reduce the risk of a first myocardial infarction. The findings for alpha-tocopherol are compatible with previous observations of reduced risk among vitamin E supplement users only. The consumption of beta-carotene-rich foods such as carrots and green-leaf vegetables may reduce the risk of myocardial infarction.

Abstract

Laboratory and epidemiological studies suggest that the antioxidants, vitamin E and beta-carotene, protect against coronary heart disease. In a European multicentre case-control study alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene concentrations were measured in adipose-tissue samples collected in 1991-92 from 683 people with acute myocardial infarction and 727 controls. Mean adipose-tissue beta-carotene concentration was 0.35 microgram/g in cases and 0.42 in controls, with age-adjusted and centre-adjusted mean difference 0.07 microgram/g (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.04-0.10). Mean alpha-tocopherol concentrations were 193 micrograms/g and 192 micrograms/g for cases and controls, respectively. The age-adjusted and centre-adjusted odds ratio for risk of myocardial infarction in the lowest quintile of beta-carotene as compared with the highest was 2.62 (95% CI 1.79-3.83). Additional control for body-mass index and smoking reduced the odds ratio to 1.78 (95% CI 1.17-2.71); other established risk factors did not substantially alter this ratio. The increased risk was mainly confined to current smokers: the multivariate odds ratio in the lowest beta-carotene quintile in smokers was 2.39 (95% CI 1.35-4.25), whereas it was 1.07 for people who had never smoked. A low alpha-tocopherol concentration was not associated with risk of myocardial infarction. Our results support the hypothesis that high beta-carotene concentrations within the normal range reduce the risk of a first myocardial infarction. The findings for alpha-tocopherol are compatible with previous observations of reduced risk among vitamin E supplement users only. The consumption of beta-carotene-rich foods such as carrots and green-leaf vegetables may reduce the risk of myocardial infarction.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:4 December 1993
Deposited On:14 Jun 2016 14:04
Last Modified:19 Jun 2016 10:17
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0140-6736
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/0140-6736(93)92751-E
PubMed ID:7901680

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