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The Protection of Māori Cultural Heritage: Post-Endorsement of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples


Lai, Jessica Christine (2011). The Protection of Māori Cultural Heritage: Post-Endorsement of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. i-call Working Paper Series 02, Universität Luzern.

Abstract

In April 2010, New Zealand gave its approval to the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (considered to be the most comprehensive text on the rights of Indigenous peoples), after having failed to do so with the UN General Assembly in 2007. The initial reasons given by New Zealand for its negative vote are assessed herein. Following this, the paper addresses the role that the Declaration will play at the national and international level, despite that it is not legally binding. It surmises that it is an important political tool at the national level, able to be used in direct negotiations between the Māori and governments. It could further be used as an interpretive tool by the courts and government agencies. The proliferation of Declaration-consistent norms at the national level could result in either the formation of international law or the placement of such norms in bi- or multilateral agreements. The final part of this paper discusses particular Articles within the Declaration that may be used to protect Māori cultural identity and cultural heritage and their legal applicability.

In April 2010, New Zealand gave its approval to the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (considered to be the most comprehensive text on the rights of Indigenous peoples), after having failed to do so with the UN General Assembly in 2007. The initial reasons given by New Zealand for its negative vote are assessed herein. Following this, the paper addresses the role that the Declaration will play at the national and international level, despite that it is not legally binding. It surmises that it is an important political tool at the national level, able to be used in direct negotiations between the Māori and governments. It could further be used as an interpretive tool by the courts and government agencies. The proliferation of Declaration-consistent norms at the national level could result in either the formation of international law or the placement of such norms in bi- or multilateral agreements. The final part of this paper discusses particular Articles within the Declaration that may be used to protect Māori cultural identity and cultural heritage and their legal applicability.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Working Paper
Communities & Collections:Working Paper Series > i-call Working Paper Series
Dewey Decimal Classification:Unspecified
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:27 Jun 2016 12:22
Last Modified:27 Jun 2016 12:45
Series Name:i-call Working Paper Series
Number of Pages:43
ISSN:1664-0144
Related URLs:http://www.rwi.uzh.ch/lehreforschung/alphabetisch/graber/Research/workingpapers.html (Organisation)
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-124704

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