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Cardiac SPECT/CCTA hybrid imaging : One answer to two questions?


Kaufmann, P A; Buechel, R R (2016). Cardiac SPECT/CCTA hybrid imaging : One answer to two questions? Herz, 41(5):391-397.

Abstract

Noninvasive cardiac imaging has witnessed tremendous advances in the recent past, particularly with regard to coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) where substantial improvements in image quality have been achieved while at the same time patients' radiation dose exposure has been reduced to the sub-millisievert range. Similarly, for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) the introduction of novel cadmium-zinc-telluride-based semiconductor detectors has significantly improved system sensitivity and image quality, enabling fast image acquisition within less than 2-3 min or reduction of radiation dose exposure to less than 5 mSv. However, neither imaging modality alone is able to fully cover the two aspects of coronary artery disease (CAD), that is, morphology and function. Both modalities have distinct advantages and shortcomings: While CCTA may prove a superb modality for excluding CAD through its excellent negative predictive value, it does not allow for assessment of hemodynamic relevance if obstructive coronary lesions are detected. Conversely, SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging cannot provide any information on the presence or absence of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. This article aims to highlight the great potential of cardiac hybrid imaging that allows for a comprehensive evaluation of CAD through combination of both morphological and functional information by fusing SPECT with CCTA.

Abstract

Noninvasive cardiac imaging has witnessed tremendous advances in the recent past, particularly with regard to coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) where substantial improvements in image quality have been achieved while at the same time patients' radiation dose exposure has been reduced to the sub-millisievert range. Similarly, for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) the introduction of novel cadmium-zinc-telluride-based semiconductor detectors has significantly improved system sensitivity and image quality, enabling fast image acquisition within less than 2-3 min or reduction of radiation dose exposure to less than 5 mSv. However, neither imaging modality alone is able to fully cover the two aspects of coronary artery disease (CAD), that is, morphology and function. Both modalities have distinct advantages and shortcomings: While CCTA may prove a superb modality for excluding CAD through its excellent negative predictive value, it does not allow for assessment of hemodynamic relevance if obstructive coronary lesions are detected. Conversely, SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging cannot provide any information on the presence or absence of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. This article aims to highlight the great potential of cardiac hybrid imaging that allows for a comprehensive evaluation of CAD through combination of both morphological and functional information by fusing SPECT with CCTA.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nuclear Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2016
Deposited On:01 Sep 2016 09:37
Last Modified:01 Sep 2016 09:37
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0340-9937
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00059-016-4438-0
PubMed ID:27286848

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