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Short-term pulse rate variability is better characterized by functional near-infrared spectroscopy than by photoplethysmography


Holper, Lisa; Seifritz, Erich; Scholkmann, Felix (2016). Short-term pulse rate variability is better characterized by functional near-infrared spectroscopy than by photoplethysmography. Journal of Biomedical Optics, 21(9):091308.

Abstract

Pulse rate variability (PRV) can be extracted from functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) (PRV(NIRS)) and photoplethysmography (PPG) (PRV(PPG)) signals. The present study compared the accuracy of simultaneously acquired PRV(NIRS) and PRV(PPG), and evaluated their different characterizations of the sympathetic (SNS) and parasympathetic (PSNS) autonomous nervous system activity. Ten healthy subjects were recorded during resting-state (RS) and respiratory challenges in two temperature conditions, i.e., room temperature (23°C) and cold temperature (4°C). PRV(NIRS) was recorded based on fNIRS measurement on the head, whereas PRV(PPG) was determined based on PPG measured at the finger. Accuracy between PRV(NIRS) and PRV(PPG), as assessed by cross-covariance and cross-sample entropy, demonstrated a high degree of correlation (r > 0.9), which was significantly reduced by respiration and cold temperature. Characterization of SNS and PSNS using frequency-domain, time-domain, and nonlinear methods showed that PRV(NIRS) provided significantly better information on increasing PSNS activity in response to respiration and cold temperature than PRV(PPG). The findings show that PRV(NIRS) may outperform PRV(PPG) under conditions in which respiration and temperature changes are present, and may, therefore, be advantageous in research and clinical settings, especially if characterization of the autonomous nervous system is desired.

Abstract

Pulse rate variability (PRV) can be extracted from functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) (PRV(NIRS)) and photoplethysmography (PPG) (PRV(PPG)) signals. The present study compared the accuracy of simultaneously acquired PRV(NIRS) and PRV(PPG), and evaluated their different characterizations of the sympathetic (SNS) and parasympathetic (PSNS) autonomous nervous system activity. Ten healthy subjects were recorded during resting-state (RS) and respiratory challenges in two temperature conditions, i.e., room temperature (23°C) and cold temperature (4°C). PRV(NIRS) was recorded based on fNIRS measurement on the head, whereas PRV(PPG) was determined based on PPG measured at the finger. Accuracy between PRV(NIRS) and PRV(PPG), as assessed by cross-covariance and cross-sample entropy, demonstrated a high degree of correlation (r > 0.9), which was significantly reduced by respiration and cold temperature. Characterization of SNS and PSNS using frequency-domain, time-domain, and nonlinear methods showed that PRV(NIRS) provided significantly better information on increasing PSNS activity in response to respiration and cold temperature than PRV(PPG). The findings show that PRV(NIRS) may outperform PRV(PPG) under conditions in which respiration and temperature changes are present, and may, therefore, be advantageous in research and clinical settings, especially if characterization of the autonomous nervous system is desired.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neonatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2016
Deposited On:08 Sep 2016 14:54
Last Modified:09 Sep 2016 07:55
Publisher:SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering
ISSN:1083-3668
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.21.9.091308
PubMed ID:27185106

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