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Rethinking the ethical approach to health information management through narration: pertinence of Ricœur’s ‘little ethics’


Mouton Dorey, Corine (2016). Rethinking the ethical approach to health information management through narration: pertinence of Ricœur’s ‘little ethics’. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy, 19(4):531-543.

Abstract

The increased complexity of health information management sows the seeds of inequalities between health care stakeholders involved in the production and use of health information. Patients may thus be more vulnerable to use of their data without their consent and breaches in confidentiality. Health care providers can also be the victims of a health information system that they do not fully master. Yet, despite its possible drawbacks, the management of health information is indispensable for advancing science, medical care and public health. Therefore, the central question addressed by this paper is how to manage health information ethically? This article argues that Paul Ricœur’s “little ethics”, based on his work on hermeneutics and narrative identity, provides a suitable ethical framework to this end. This ethical theory has the merit of helping to harmonise self-esteem and solicitude amongst patients and healthcare providers, and at the same time provides an ethics of justice in public health. A matrix, derived from Ricœur’s ethics, has been developed as a solution to overcoming possible conflicts between privacy interests and the common good in the management of health information.

Abstract

The increased complexity of health information management sows the seeds of inequalities between health care stakeholders involved in the production and use of health information. Patients may thus be more vulnerable to use of their data without their consent and breaches in confidentiality. Health care providers can also be the victims of a health information system that they do not fully master. Yet, despite its possible drawbacks, the management of health information is indispensable for advancing science, medical care and public health. Therefore, the central question addressed by this paper is how to manage health information ethically? This article argues that Paul Ricœur’s “little ethics”, based on his work on hermeneutics and narrative identity, provides a suitable ethical framework to this end. This ethical theory has the merit of helping to harmonise self-esteem and solicitude amongst patients and healthcare providers, and at the same time provides an ethics of justice in public health. A matrix, derived from Ricœur’s ethics, has been developed as a solution to overcoming possible conflicts between privacy interests and the common good in the management of health information.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Ethics and History of Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:21 Sep 2016 09:41
Last Modified:02 Nov 2016 02:01
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1386-7423
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11019-016-9713-6

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