UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The Future of Online Content Personalisation: Technology, Law and Digital Freedoms


Graber, Christoph B (2016). The Future of Online Content Personalisation: Technology, Law and Digital Freedoms. i-call Working Paper Series 1, University of Zurich.

Abstract

As online information is increasingly tailored, or “personalised”, to the user, it has been praised by some as a pragmatic response to information overload, while criticised by others as creating an echo chamber that threatens deliberative democracy. The unsettling question is whether the latest wave of innovation in online content personalisation technologies has shifted decision-making power from humans to computers. The paper argues that a thorough understanding of personalisation technologies is necessary to critically evaluate their normative effect and impact on social values. It reflects on the differences between regulation by code and regulation by law, exploring how code affects individual and social autonomies, and considering whether meta-rules regulating code are appropriate. The aim of this paper is to detail the constitutive features of the digital world and elucidate how these create norms that regulate the Internet.

Abstract

As online information is increasingly tailored, or “personalised”, to the user, it has been praised by some as a pragmatic response to information overload, while criticised by others as creating an echo chamber that threatens deliberative democracy. The unsettling question is whether the latest wave of innovation in online content personalisation technologies has shifted decision-making power from humans to computers. The paper argues that a thorough understanding of personalisation technologies is necessary to critically evaluate their normative effect and impact on social values. It reflects on the differences between regulation by code and regulation by law, exploring how code affects individual and social autonomies, and considering whether meta-rules regulating code are appropriate. The aim of this paper is to detail the constitutive features of the digital world and elucidate how these create norms that regulate the Internet.

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 13 Oct 2016
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Working Paper
Communities & Collections:02 Faculty of Law > Institute of Legal Sciences > Basic Subjects
Working Paper Series > i-call Working Paper Series
Dewey Decimal Classification:340 Law
Language:English
Date:October 2016
Deposited On:13 Oct 2016 08:44
Last Modified:13 Oct 2016 08:46
Series Name:i-call Working Paper Series
ISSN:1664-0144
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://www.rwi.uzh.ch/dam/jcr:b779a6ee-bdbc-412e-a855-371df2f46293/201601_Personalisation_Graber_i-call-WP_2016_10_03.pdf
Related URLs:http://www.rwi.uzh.ch/de/lehreforschung/alphabetisch/graber/Research/workingpapers2015.html

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 412kB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations