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The satiating hormone amylin enhances neurogenesis in the area postrema of adult rats


Liberini, Claudia G; Borner, Tito; Boyle, Christina N; Lutz, Thomas A (2016). The satiating hormone amylin enhances neurogenesis in the area postrema of adult rats. Molecular Metabolism, 5(10):834-843.

Abstract

Objective Adult neurogenesis in the subgranular zone and subventricular zone is generally accepted, but its existence in other brain areas is still controversial. Circumventricular organs, such as the area postrema (AP) have recently been described as potential neurogenic niches in the adult brain. The AP is the major site of action of the satiating hormone amylin. Amylin has been shown to promote the formation of neuronal projections originating from the AP in neonatal rodents but the role of amylin in adult neurogenesis remains unknown. Methods To test this, we first performed an RNA-sequencing of the AP of adult rats acutely injected with either amylin (20 μg/kg), amylin plus the amylin receptor antagonist AC187 (500 μg/kg) or vehicle. Second, animals were subcutaneously equipped with minipumps releasing either amylin (50 μg/kg/day) or vehicle for 3 weeks to assess cell proliferation and differentiation with the 5′-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) technique. Results Acute amylin injections affected genes involved in pathways and processes that control adult neurogenesis. Amylin consistently upregulated NeuroD1 transcript and protein in the adult AP, and this effect was blocked by the co-administration of AC187. Further, chronic amylin treatment increased the number of newly proliferated AP-cells and significantly promoted their differentiation into neurons rather than astrocytes. Conclusion Our findings revealed a novel role of the satiating hormone amylin in promoting neurogenesis in the AP of adult rats.

Abstract

Objective Adult neurogenesis in the subgranular zone and subventricular zone is generally accepted, but its existence in other brain areas is still controversial. Circumventricular organs, such as the area postrema (AP) have recently been described as potential neurogenic niches in the adult brain. The AP is the major site of action of the satiating hormone amylin. Amylin has been shown to promote the formation of neuronal projections originating from the AP in neonatal rodents but the role of amylin in adult neurogenesis remains unknown. Methods To test this, we first performed an RNA-sequencing of the AP of adult rats acutely injected with either amylin (20 μg/kg), amylin plus the amylin receptor antagonist AC187 (500 μg/kg) or vehicle. Second, animals were subcutaneously equipped with minipumps releasing either amylin (50 μg/kg/day) or vehicle for 3 weeks to assess cell proliferation and differentiation with the 5′-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) technique. Results Acute amylin injections affected genes involved in pathways and processes that control adult neurogenesis. Amylin consistently upregulated NeuroD1 transcript and protein in the adult AP, and this effect was blocked by the co-administration of AC187. Further, chronic amylin treatment increased the number of newly proliferated AP-cells and significantly promoted their differentiation into neurons rather than astrocytes. Conclusion Our findings revealed a novel role of the satiating hormone amylin in promoting neurogenesis in the AP of adult rats.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:11 Oct 2016 06:53
Last Modified:11 Oct 2016 06:53
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2212-8778
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.molmet.2016.06.015
PubMed ID:27688997

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