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Do they really hybridize? A field study in artificially established mixed populations of Euphrasia minima and E. salisburgensis (Orobanchaceae) in the Swiss Alps


Liebst, B (2008). Do they really hybridize? A field study in artificially established mixed populations of Euphrasia minima and E. salisburgensis (Orobanchaceae) in the Swiss Alps. Plant Systematics and Evolution, 273(3/4):179-189.

Abstract

Hybridization and introgression in the European species of Euphrasia depend on the relationships between the species, on flower size and habitat. Hybridization between Euphrasia minima and Euphrasia salisburgensis was investigated in their natural habitat using artificial sympatric populations of both species in the Swiss Alps. The insect behavior in the populations suggests, that cross-pollination is likely to occur. A number of putative hybrids were detected by morphological characteristics, and their hybrid origin was verified using RAPD analysis. The predominance of RAPD bands in one of the species and the occurrence of these bands in some plants of the second species point to earlier introgression events. The number of hybrids found in the artificial populations together with results of earlier studies indicate that insect visits and cross-pollination in small-flowered Euphrasia species in lower alpine regions may be more common than has been suggested in the past.

Abstract

Hybridization and introgression in the European species of Euphrasia depend on the relationships between the species, on flower size and habitat. Hybridization between Euphrasia minima and Euphrasia salisburgensis was investigated in their natural habitat using artificial sympatric populations of both species in the Swiss Alps. The insect behavior in the populations suggests, that cross-pollination is likely to occur. A number of putative hybrids were detected by morphological characteristics, and their hybrid origin was verified using RAPD analysis. The predominance of RAPD bands in one of the species and the occurrence of these bands in some plants of the second species point to earlier introgression events. The number of hybrids found in the artificial populations together with results of earlier studies indicate that insect visits and cross-pollination in small-flowered Euphrasia species in lower alpine regions may be more common than has been suggested in the past.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Systematic Botany and Botanical Gardens
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Euphrasia minima, Euphrasia salisburgensis, Field experiment, Insect behavior, Hybridization, Introgression, RAPD, Discriminant analyses
Language:English
Date:July 2008
Deposited On:06 Feb 2009 10:54
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:57
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0378-2697
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00606-008-0010-6

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