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Fatal liver and lung alveolar echinococcosis with newly developed neurologic symptoms due to the brain involvement


Kvascevicius, Robertas; Lapteva, Ona; Awar, Omar; Audronyte, Egle; Neverauskiene, Laura; Kvasceviciene, Eleonora; Sokolovas, Vitalijus; Strupas, Kestutis; Marcinkute, Audrone; Deplazes, Peter; Müllhaupt, Beat (2016). Fatal liver and lung alveolar echinococcosis with newly developed neurologic symptoms due to the brain involvement. The Surgery Journal, 02(03):e83-e88.

Abstract

The fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis causes human alveolar echinococcosis, commonly affecting the liver. However, in ∼1% of cases, systematic spread of the disease involves the brain as well. A patient had a 6-year history of liver and lung alveolar echinococcosis that was considered not suitable for surgery, and treatment with albendazole was introduced. After the appearance of neurologic disturbances, an intracranial mass lesion was demonstrated by radiologic imaging. The lesion was surgically removed, and histologic analysis revealed metacestode tissue of E. multilocularis. Despite the surgical resection of the lesion, the patient died of progression of systemic alveolar echinococcosis. The authors highly recommend implementing neurologic monitoring to the follow-up algorithm for patients with systemically disseminated alveolar echinococcosis. When neurologic symptoms occur, radiologic imaging of the brain should be obtained immediately. Surgery should be considered for all intracranial echinococcal lesions, unless the lesion is located in the eloquent brain area.

The fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis causes human alveolar echinococcosis, commonly affecting the liver. However, in ∼1% of cases, systematic spread of the disease involves the brain as well. A patient had a 6-year history of liver and lung alveolar echinococcosis that was considered not suitable for surgery, and treatment with albendazole was introduced. After the appearance of neurologic disturbances, an intracranial mass lesion was demonstrated by radiologic imaging. The lesion was surgically removed, and histologic analysis revealed metacestode tissue of E. multilocularis. Despite the surgical resection of the lesion, the patient died of progression of systemic alveolar echinococcosis. The authors highly recommend implementing neurologic monitoring to the follow-up algorithm for patients with systemically disseminated alveolar echinococcosis. When neurologic symptoms occur, radiologic imaging of the brain should be obtained immediately. Surgery should be considered for all intracranial echinococcal lesions, unless the lesion is located in the eloquent brain area.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Parasitology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Parasitology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
600 Technology
Language:English
Date:August 2016
Deposited On:17 Oct 2016 09:47
Last Modified:21 Nov 2016 10:08
Publisher:Georg Thieme Verlag
ISSN:2378-5136
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0036-1592122
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-126571

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