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Acute allograft rejection and immunosuppression: influence on endogenous melatonin secretion


Cardell, M; Jung, F J; Zhai, W; Hillinger, S; Welp, A; Manz, B; Weder, W; Korom, S (2008). Acute allograft rejection and immunosuppression: influence on endogenous melatonin secretion. Journal of Pineal Research, 44(3):261-266.

Abstract

Melatonin displays a dose-dependent immunoregulatory effect in vitro and in vivo. Exogenous high-dose melatonin therapy exerted an immunosuppressive effect, abrogating acute rejection (AR), significantly prolonging transplant survival. Endogenous melatonin secretion, in response to heterotopic rat cardiac allograft transplantation (Tx), was investigated during the AR response and under standardized immunosuppressive maintenance therapy with cyclosporin A (CsA) and rapamycin (RPM). Recipients of syngeneic transplants, and recipients of allogeneic grafts, either untreated or receiving immunosuppressive therapy constituted the experimental groups. Endogenous circadian melatonin levels were measured at 07:00, 19:00, and 24:00 hr, using a novel radioimmunoassay (RIA) procedure, under standardized 12-hr-light/dark-conditions (light off: 19:00 hr; light on: 07:00 hr), before and after Tx. Neither the operative trauma, nor the challenge with a perfused allograft or the AR response influenced endogenous melatonin peak secretion. Immunosuppressive therapy with CsA led to a significant increase in peak secretion, measured for days 7 (212 +/- 40.7 pg/mL; P < 0.05), 14 (255 +/- 13.9 pg/mL; P < 0.001), and 21 (219 +/- 34 pg/mL; P < 0.01) after Tx, as compared with naïve animals (155 +/- 25.8 pg/mL). In contrast, treatment with RPM significantly decreased the melatonin peak post-Tx up to day 7 (87 +/- 25.2 pg/mL; P < 0.001), compared with naïve animals (155 +/- 25.8 pg/mL). These findings imply a robust nature of the endogenous circadian melatonin secretion kinetics, even against the background of profound allogeneic stimuli. Immunosuppressive maintenance therapy with CsA and RPM modulated early melatonin secretion, indicating a specific secondary action of these drugs. Further studies are necessary to disclose the long-term effect of immunosuppressive therapy on circadian melatonin secretion in transplant recipients.

Abstract

Melatonin displays a dose-dependent immunoregulatory effect in vitro and in vivo. Exogenous high-dose melatonin therapy exerted an immunosuppressive effect, abrogating acute rejection (AR), significantly prolonging transplant survival. Endogenous melatonin secretion, in response to heterotopic rat cardiac allograft transplantation (Tx), was investigated during the AR response and under standardized immunosuppressive maintenance therapy with cyclosporin A (CsA) and rapamycin (RPM). Recipients of syngeneic transplants, and recipients of allogeneic grafts, either untreated or receiving immunosuppressive therapy constituted the experimental groups. Endogenous circadian melatonin levels were measured at 07:00, 19:00, and 24:00 hr, using a novel radioimmunoassay (RIA) procedure, under standardized 12-hr-light/dark-conditions (light off: 19:00 hr; light on: 07:00 hr), before and after Tx. Neither the operative trauma, nor the challenge with a perfused allograft or the AR response influenced endogenous melatonin peak secretion. Immunosuppressive therapy with CsA led to a significant increase in peak secretion, measured for days 7 (212 +/- 40.7 pg/mL; P < 0.05), 14 (255 +/- 13.9 pg/mL; P < 0.001), and 21 (219 +/- 34 pg/mL; P < 0.01) after Tx, as compared with naïve animals (155 +/- 25.8 pg/mL). In contrast, treatment with RPM significantly decreased the melatonin peak post-Tx up to day 7 (87 +/- 25.2 pg/mL; P < 0.001), compared with naïve animals (155 +/- 25.8 pg/mL). These findings imply a robust nature of the endogenous circadian melatonin secretion kinetics, even against the background of profound allogeneic stimuli. Immunosuppressive maintenance therapy with CsA and RPM modulated early melatonin secretion, indicating a specific secondary action of these drugs. Further studies are necessary to disclose the long-term effect of immunosuppressive therapy on circadian melatonin secretion in transplant recipients.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Thoracic Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:April 2008
Deposited On:12 Feb 2009 10:06
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:58
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0742-3098
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-079X.2007.00521.x
PubMed ID:18339121

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