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Molecular mechanisms of renal apical Na/phosphate cotransport.


Murer, H; Biber, J (1996). Molecular mechanisms of renal apical Na/phosphate cotransport. Annual Review of Physiology, 58:607-618.

Abstract

In the proximal tubule, sodium-dependent transport of phosphate (Pi) through the brush-border membrane represents the initial step in Pi reabsorption. cDNAs encoding several renal proximal tubule apical Na/Pi cotransport systems have been identified. These Na/Pi cotransporters are subdivided into type I (NaPi-1) and a type II (NaPi-2). Electrophysiological studies reveal that Pi transport by Na/Pi cotransporters is electrogenic. Regulation of proximal Pi reabsorption by dietary Pi intake and parathyroid hormone is primarily due to an alteration of apical type II Na/Pi cotransport; a rapid change of brush-border Na/Pi cotransport most likely occurs via an endo/exocytic mechanism. No evidence for physiological control of type I cotransporters has been obtained. Altered Pi reabsorption as observed in X-linked hypophosphatemia is largely via the type II Na/Pi cotransporter.

In the proximal tubule, sodium-dependent transport of phosphate (Pi) through the brush-border membrane represents the initial step in Pi reabsorption. cDNAs encoding several renal proximal tubule apical Na/Pi cotransport systems have been identified. These Na/Pi cotransporters are subdivided into type I (NaPi-1) and a type II (NaPi-2). Electrophysiological studies reveal that Pi transport by Na/Pi cotransporters is electrogenic. Regulation of proximal Pi reabsorption by dietary Pi intake and parathyroid hormone is primarily due to an alteration of apical type II Na/Pi cotransport; a rapid change of brush-border Na/Pi cotransport most likely occurs via an endo/exocytic mechanism. No evidence for physiological control of type I cotransporters has been obtained. Altered Pi reabsorption as observed in X-linked hypophosphatemia is largely via the type II Na/Pi cotransporter.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:1996
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:18
Publisher:Annual Reviews
ISSN:0066-4278
Publisher DOI:10.1146/annurev.ph.58.030196.003135
Related URLs:http://arjournals.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146%2Fannurev.ph.58.030196.003135
PubMed ID:8815811

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