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Quadriceps tendinosis and patellar tendinosis in professional beach volleyball players: sonographic findings in correlation with clinical symptoms


Pfirrmann, C W A; Jost, B; Pirkl, C; Aitzetmüller, G; Lajtai, G (2008). Quadriceps tendinosis and patellar tendinosis in professional beach volleyball players: sonographic findings in correlation with clinical symptoms. European Radiology, 18(8):1703-1709.

Abstract

The purpose was to assess quadriceps and patellar tendinosis in professional beach volleyball players and to correlate ultrasound findings with clinical symptoms. During a grand-slam beach volleyball tournaments all 202 athletes (100 men and 102 women) were invited to participate at this study. Sixty-one athletes (38 male, mean age 29.6, 23 female, mean age 27.1) were included. The dominant leg was right in 51 (84%) and left in ten athletes (16%). Lysholm knee score and pain during the game was assessed using a visual analogue scale. Sonography of the quadriceps tendon and the patellar tendon was performed by a blinded sonographer. Sonographic findings were compared between both legs and correlated to clinical findings using a regression analysis. Quadriceps tendinosis was diagnosed in 13 (21%, dominant leg)/21 (34%, non-dominant leg), patellar tendinosis in 13(21%)/18(30%). Only sonographic findings at the quadriceps tendon were significantly associated with pain: thickness of the quadriceps tendon (mean diameter 6.9 mm/7.1 mm, significant for both legs P = 0.011/P = 0.030), abnormal echo texture (11/16; P = 0.001/P = 0.228), areas with positive power Doppler signals (mean number 0.3/0.4; P = 0.049/0.346), calcifications (mean number: 0.9/1.1; P = 0.021/0.864). A relationship between findings at patellar tendon was not found. Quadriceps tendinosis is as common as patellar tendinosis in professional beach volleyball players. Thickening and structure alteration of the quadriceps tendon is associated with anterior knee pain during beach volleyball.

Abstract

The purpose was to assess quadriceps and patellar tendinosis in professional beach volleyball players and to correlate ultrasound findings with clinical symptoms. During a grand-slam beach volleyball tournaments all 202 athletes (100 men and 102 women) were invited to participate at this study. Sixty-one athletes (38 male, mean age 29.6, 23 female, mean age 27.1) were included. The dominant leg was right in 51 (84%) and left in ten athletes (16%). Lysholm knee score and pain during the game was assessed using a visual analogue scale. Sonography of the quadriceps tendon and the patellar tendon was performed by a blinded sonographer. Sonographic findings were compared between both legs and correlated to clinical findings using a regression analysis. Quadriceps tendinosis was diagnosed in 13 (21%, dominant leg)/21 (34%, non-dominant leg), patellar tendinosis in 13(21%)/18(30%). Only sonographic findings at the quadriceps tendon were significantly associated with pain: thickness of the quadriceps tendon (mean diameter 6.9 mm/7.1 mm, significant for both legs P = 0.011/P = 0.030), abnormal echo texture (11/16; P = 0.001/P = 0.228), areas with positive power Doppler signals (mean number 0.3/0.4; P = 0.049/0.346), calcifications (mean number: 0.9/1.1; P = 0.021/0.864). A relationship between findings at patellar tendon was not found. Quadriceps tendinosis is as common as patellar tendinosis in professional beach volleyball players. Thickening and structure alteration of the quadriceps tendon is associated with anterior knee pain during beach volleyball.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2008
Deposited On:09 Feb 2009 19:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:58
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0938-7994
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00330-008-0926-9
PubMed ID:18386014

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