UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Das zyanotische Kind mit kardialer Erkrankung im Notfalldienst


Tomaske, M; Kadner, A; Fasnacht, M; Bauersfeld, U (2009). Das zyanotische Kind mit kardialer Erkrankung im Notfalldienst. Notfall & Rettungsmedizin, 12(1):51-55.

Abstract

Im Gegensatz zu Erwachsenen mit vorwiegend pulmonalen Erkrankungen wie der chronisch obstruktiven Lungenerkrankung, entsteht bei Kindern eine zentrale Zyanose meist durch angeborene Herzfehler. Zyanotische Herzfehler kommen mit einer Häufigkeit von ca. 13 pro 10.000 Lebendgeburten vor. Dadurch, dass heutzutage auch komplexe Herzfehler erfolgreich palliiert werden, steigt die Wahrscheinlichkeit stetig an, im Rettungsdienst Kindern mit einer zentralen Zyanose zu begegnen. Ursachen für das untersättigte Blut in den großen Arterien können eine Minderperfusion der Lungen oder eine vermehrte Durchmischung von arteriellen mit venösem Blut über einen Rechts-Links-Shunt sein. Der beste Indikator einer zentralen Zyanose ist die Zunge, da sie reichlich vaskularisiert und frei von Pigmenten ist. Je nach Altersklasse ist eher eine primäre Volumentherapie oder eine großzügige Sauerstoffapplikation essenziell, oder aber auch keine Notfalltherapie notwendig. Nach der präklinischen Versorgung ist eine stationäre Einweisung unabdingbar, bevorzugt in ein Zentrum mit der Option der kinderintensivmedizinischen oder kinderkardiologischen Betreuung. = In contrast to the adult population with predominant pulmonary disease like chronic obstructive lung disease, a central cyanosis in the pediatric population is mainly caused by a congenital heart defect. The incidence of cyanotic congenital heart defects is about 13 per 10000 live births. Due to the fact, that nowadays even complex heart defects are successfully palliated, the chance to come across a child with central cyanosis in the emergency setting rises steadily. Reasons for the desaturated blood in the great arteries can either be a reduced lung perfusion or an increased mixture of arterial and venous blood due to a right-to-left shunt. The best indicator to detect a central cyanosis is the tongue since it has a rich vascular supply and is free of pigmentation. Depending on the child’s age, the essential primary rescue therapy is either the application of volume or high oxygen. In other cases no rescue therapy is required. After the preclinical rescue therapy, the child should always be admitted to a hospital, preferably to a pediatric intensive care unit or pediatric cardiology.

Abstract

Im Gegensatz zu Erwachsenen mit vorwiegend pulmonalen Erkrankungen wie der chronisch obstruktiven Lungenerkrankung, entsteht bei Kindern eine zentrale Zyanose meist durch angeborene Herzfehler. Zyanotische Herzfehler kommen mit einer Häufigkeit von ca. 13 pro 10.000 Lebendgeburten vor. Dadurch, dass heutzutage auch komplexe Herzfehler erfolgreich palliiert werden, steigt die Wahrscheinlichkeit stetig an, im Rettungsdienst Kindern mit einer zentralen Zyanose zu begegnen. Ursachen für das untersättigte Blut in den großen Arterien können eine Minderperfusion der Lungen oder eine vermehrte Durchmischung von arteriellen mit venösem Blut über einen Rechts-Links-Shunt sein. Der beste Indikator einer zentralen Zyanose ist die Zunge, da sie reichlich vaskularisiert und frei von Pigmenten ist. Je nach Altersklasse ist eher eine primäre Volumentherapie oder eine großzügige Sauerstoffapplikation essenziell, oder aber auch keine Notfalltherapie notwendig. Nach der präklinischen Versorgung ist eine stationäre Einweisung unabdingbar, bevorzugt in ein Zentrum mit der Option der kinderintensivmedizinischen oder kinderkardiologischen Betreuung. = In contrast to the adult population with predominant pulmonary disease like chronic obstructive lung disease, a central cyanosis in the pediatric population is mainly caused by a congenital heart defect. The incidence of cyanotic congenital heart defects is about 13 per 10000 live births. Due to the fact, that nowadays even complex heart defects are successfully palliated, the chance to come across a child with central cyanosis in the emergency setting rises steadily. Reasons for the desaturated blood in the great arteries can either be a reduced lung perfusion or an increased mixture of arterial and venous blood due to a right-to-left shunt. The best indicator to detect a central cyanosis is the tongue since it has a rich vascular supply and is free of pigmentation. Depending on the child’s age, the essential primary rescue therapy is either the application of volume or high oxygen. In other cases no rescue therapy is required. After the preclinical rescue therapy, the child should always be admitted to a hospital, preferably to a pediatric intensive care unit or pediatric cardiology.

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 06 Mar 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Other titles:The cyanotic child with cardiac disease in emergency medicine
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2009
Deposited On:06 Mar 2009 07:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:58
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1434-6222
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10049-007-0966-8

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations