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Surface marker-defined head kidney granulocytes and B lymphocytes of rainbow trout express benzo[alpha]pyrene-inducible cytochrome P4501A protein


Nakayama, A; Riesen, I; Köllner, B; Eppler, E; Segner, H (2008). Surface marker-defined head kidney granulocytes and B lymphocytes of rainbow trout express benzo[alpha]pyrene-inducible cytochrome P4501A protein. Toxicological Sciences, 103(1):86-96.

Abstract

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) are immunotoxic to fish. Metabolism of PAHs in immune cells has been implicated in PAH immunotoxicity in mammals, but for fish the presence of metabolic enzymes in immune cells is less clear. The objective of this study was to examine localization and induction of the BaP-metabolizing biotransformation enzyme, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A), in head kidney immune cells of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the first step, we measured induction of CYP1A-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity and CYP1A protein in head kidney of rainbow trout treated with a single intraperitoneal (ip) injection of 25 mg BaP/kg body weight. From days 3 to 10 postinjection, the BaP treatment led to a significant elevation of EROD and CYP1A protein in head kidney and liver, with CYP1A expression levels in the head kidney being much lower than in the liver. Next, we examined the cellular localization of CYP1A protein in the head kidney cell types: vascular endothelial, endocrine and lymphoid cells. CYP1A immunoreactivity was detectable only in BaP-treated trout, where it was localized in endothelial and lymphoid cells. Finally, we aimed to clarify which of the hematopoietic cell types possess CYP1A protein. Using double immunostaining for CYP1A and surface markers of rainbow trout immune cells, we identified B lymphocytes and granulocytes expressing inducible CYP1A protein and being the likely sites of BaP metabolism in the head kidney.

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) are immunotoxic to fish. Metabolism of PAHs in immune cells has been implicated in PAH immunotoxicity in mammals, but for fish the presence of metabolic enzymes in immune cells is less clear. The objective of this study was to examine localization and induction of the BaP-metabolizing biotransformation enzyme, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A), in head kidney immune cells of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the first step, we measured induction of CYP1A-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity and CYP1A protein in head kidney of rainbow trout treated with a single intraperitoneal (ip) injection of 25 mg BaP/kg body weight. From days 3 to 10 postinjection, the BaP treatment led to a significant elevation of EROD and CYP1A protein in head kidney and liver, with CYP1A expression levels in the head kidney being much lower than in the liver. Next, we examined the cellular localization of CYP1A protein in the head kidney cell types: vascular endothelial, endocrine and lymphoid cells. CYP1A immunoreactivity was detectable only in BaP-treated trout, where it was localized in endothelial and lymphoid cells. Finally, we aimed to clarify which of the hematopoietic cell types possess CYP1A protein. Using double immunostaining for CYP1A and surface markers of rainbow trout immune cells, we identified B lymphocytes and granulocytes expressing inducible CYP1A protein and being the likely sites of BaP metabolism in the head kidney.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:14 February 2008
Deposited On:10 Feb 2009 08:02
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:59
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1096-0929
Additional Information:This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Toxicological Sciences following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Toxicological Sciences, doi:10.1093/toxsci/kfn024 is available online at: http://toxsci.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/kfn024v1
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/toxsci/kfn024
PubMed ID:18281257
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-13159

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