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Cellular mechanisms in renal tubular transport of divalent inorganic anions.


Murer, H; Biber, J (1996). Cellular mechanisms in renal tubular transport of divalent inorganic anions. Néphrologie, 17(7):365-369.

Abstract

The kidney is a key organ in the homeostasis of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and sulfate (Si). These anions are freely filtered at the glomerular capillaries and are then reabsorbed in the proximal tubule. Studies on isolated membrane vesicles allowed the identification of Na/phosphate and Na/sulfate-cotransporters. Subsequently these transporters have been cloned. Vesicle studies documented that physiological (and pathophysiological) alterations involve regulated transport rates of these cotransporters. Molecular studies using cDNA-probes and specific antibodies indicated that physiological regulation occurs at multiple cellular levels (e.g. transcription/translation and membrane traffic).

Abstract

The kidney is a key organ in the homeostasis of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and sulfate (Si). These anions are freely filtered at the glomerular capillaries and are then reabsorbed in the proximal tubule. Studies on isolated membrane vesicles allowed the identification of Na/phosphate and Na/sulfate-cotransporters. Subsequently these transporters have been cloned. Vesicle studies documented that physiological (and pathophysiological) alterations involve regulated transport rates of these cotransporters. Molecular studies using cDNA-probes and specific antibodies indicated that physiological regulation occurs at multiple cellular levels (e.g. transcription/translation and membrane traffic).

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1 citation in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:1996
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:18
Publisher:Médecine et Hygiène
ISSN:0250-4960
PubMed ID:8987043

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