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The benefit of image guidance for the contralateral interhemispheric approach to the lateral ventricle


Fronda, C; Miller, D; Kappus, C; Bertalanffy, H; Sure, U (2008). The benefit of image guidance for the contralateral interhemispheric approach to the lateral ventricle. Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery, 110(6):580-586.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Recently, neurosurgeons have increasingly faced small intracerebral lesions in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients. Here, we evaluated a series of four patients with nearly asymptomatic intraventricular tumors close to the corpus callosum that had been treated with the aid of an image-guided transcallosal approach. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Four consecutive patients suffering from left intra- and paraventricular tumors were operated on via a contralateral interhemispheric transcallosal approach with the aid of neuronavigation. Our image-guided system directed: (1) the skin incision, (2) the interhemispheric dissection, and (3) the incision of the corpus callosum. RESULTS: Using the image-guided contralateral interhemispheric transcallosal approach to the left ventricle all lesions have been completely resected without the risk of damage to the dominant hemisphere. The callosal incision was kept as limited as possible (1.2-2.1cm) depending on the size of the tumor. No postoperative neurological or neuropsychological deficit was observed in our series. CONCLUSION: Neuronavigation facilitates a safe and targeted contralateral interhemispheric transcallosal approach to the dominant hemisphere's lateral ventricle. Our technique minimizes the risk of damage to the dominant hemisphere and requires only a limited opening of the corpus callosum, which might decrease the risk of neuropsychological morbidity.

OBJECTIVES: Recently, neurosurgeons have increasingly faced small intracerebral lesions in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients. Here, we evaluated a series of four patients with nearly asymptomatic intraventricular tumors close to the corpus callosum that had been treated with the aid of an image-guided transcallosal approach. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Four consecutive patients suffering from left intra- and paraventricular tumors were operated on via a contralateral interhemispheric transcallosal approach with the aid of neuronavigation. Our image-guided system directed: (1) the skin incision, (2) the interhemispheric dissection, and (3) the incision of the corpus callosum. RESULTS: Using the image-guided contralateral interhemispheric transcallosal approach to the left ventricle all lesions have been completely resected without the risk of damage to the dominant hemisphere. The callosal incision was kept as limited as possible (1.2-2.1cm) depending on the size of the tumor. No postoperative neurological or neuropsychological deficit was observed in our series. CONCLUSION: Neuronavigation facilitates a safe and targeted contralateral interhemispheric transcallosal approach to the dominant hemisphere's lateral ventricle. Our technique minimizes the risk of damage to the dominant hemisphere and requires only a limited opening of the corpus callosum, which might decrease the risk of neuropsychological morbidity.

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6 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2008
Deposited On:16 Feb 2009 13:35
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:00
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0303-8467
Additional Information:Full text article at http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0303-8467(08)00084-X
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.clineuro.2008.02.024
PubMed ID:18423851

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