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Control of DNA polymerase lambda stability by phosphorylation and ubiquitination during the cell cycle


Wimmer, U; Ferrari, E; Hunziker, P; Hübscher, U (2008). Control of DNA polymerase lambda stability by phosphorylation and ubiquitination during the cell cycle. EMBO Reports, 9(10):1027-1033.

Abstract

DNA polymerase (Pol) lambda is a DNA repair enzyme involved in base excision repair, non-homologous end joining and translesion synthesis. Recently, we identified Pol lambda as an interaction partner of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) that is central to the cell cycle G1/S transition and S-phase progression. This interaction leads to in vitro phosphorylation of Pol lambda, and its in vivo phosphorylation pattern during cell cycle progression mimics the modulation of CDK2/cyclin A. Here, we identify several phosphorylation sites of Pol lambda. Experiments with phosphorylation-defective mutants suggest that phosphorylation of Thr 553 is important for maintaining Pol lambda stability, as it is targeted to the proteasomal degradation pathway through ubiquitination unless this residue is phosphorylated. In particular, Pol lambda is stabilized during cell cycle progression in the late S and G2 phases. This most likely allows Pol lambda to correctly conduct repair of damaged DNA during and after S phase.

Abstract

DNA polymerase (Pol) lambda is a DNA repair enzyme involved in base excision repair, non-homologous end joining and translesion synthesis. Recently, we identified Pol lambda as an interaction partner of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) that is central to the cell cycle G1/S transition and S-phase progression. This interaction leads to in vitro phosphorylation of Pol lambda, and its in vivo phosphorylation pattern during cell cycle progression mimics the modulation of CDK2/cyclin A. Here, we identify several phosphorylation sites of Pol lambda. Experiments with phosphorylation-defective mutants suggest that phosphorylation of Thr 553 is important for maintaining Pol lambda stability, as it is targeted to the proteasomal degradation pathway through ubiquitination unless this residue is phosphorylated. In particular, Pol lambda is stabilized during cell cycle progression in the late S and G2 phases. This most likely allows Pol lambda to correctly conduct repair of damaged DNA during and after S phase.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Functional Genomics Center Zurich
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
08 University Research Priority Programs > Systems Biology / Functional Genomics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:05 Mar 2009 09:54
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:01
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:1469-221X
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/embor.2008.148
PubMed ID:18688254

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