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Who fears being laughed at? The location of gelotophobia in the Eysenckian PEN-model of personality


Ruch, Willibald; Proyer, Rene T (2009). Who fears being laughed at? The location of gelotophobia in the Eysenckian PEN-model of personality. Personality and Individual Differences, 46(5-6):627-630.

Abstract

The first empirical studies on the fear of being laughed at (gelotophobia; Ruch & Proyer, 2008a,b) indicated that it is a valid and useful new individual differences variable. The aim of the present paper is to examine where in the Eysenckian PEN-model gelotophobia can be located. Based on the available literature, gelotophobes are expected to be introverted, neurotic high P individuals. About N = 230 participants, completed the revised form of the EPQ R, all items from precursors of the P scale, and a gelotophobia questionnaire. Gelotophobes could be described as introverted, scoring higher in the older (more clinically oriented) versions of the P scale. Social desirability did not contribute substantially to gelotophobia. A stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that the Eysenckian superfactors explained 37% of the fear of being laughed at when older P scales were included. Gelotophobia can be well located in and predicted by established personality variables. However, not all of the variance is accounted for by personality.

Abstract

The first empirical studies on the fear of being laughed at (gelotophobia; Ruch & Proyer, 2008a,b) indicated that it is a valid and useful new individual differences variable. The aim of the present paper is to examine where in the Eysenckian PEN-model gelotophobia can be located. Based on the available literature, gelotophobes are expected to be introverted, neurotic high P individuals. About N = 230 participants, completed the revised form of the EPQ R, all items from precursors of the P scale, and a gelotophobia questionnaire. Gelotophobes could be described as introverted, scoring higher in the older (more clinically oriented) versions of the P scale. Social desirability did not contribute substantially to gelotophobia. A stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that the Eysenckian superfactors explained 37% of the fear of being laughed at when older P scales were included. Gelotophobia can be well located in and predicted by established personality variables. However, not all of the variance is accounted for by personality.

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27 citations in Web of Science®
29 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Extraversion, Gelotophobia, Laughter, Neuroticism, PEN-model, Psychoticism
Language:English
Date:April 2009
Deposited On:14 Mar 2009 18:35
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:01
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0191-8869
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2009.01.004

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