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Baseline staging of melanoma with unknown primary site: the value of serum s100 protein and positron emission tomography


Oberholzer, P A; Urosevic, M; Steinert, H C; Dummer, R (2008). Baseline staging of melanoma with unknown primary site: the value of serum s100 protein and positron emission tomography. Dermatology, 217(4):351-355.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Baseline staging is important in all melanoma types, including melanoma with unknown primary site (MUP). Staging includes different examination strategies, each with different accuracy. OBJECTIVE: To determine the value of serum S100 protein levels and positron emission tomography (PET) in the baseline staging of MUP. METHODS: Twenty patients with MUP were evaluable for the analysis between 1996 and 2007 with both S100 assessment and PET performed for baseline staging. RESULTS: Serum S100 was elevated in 7 patients (35%). The PET scan detected the metastases in 6 of 7 patients with elevated serum S100 protein showing a strong correlation (p = 0.005). Patients with metastases had significantly higher serum S100 levels (p = 0.01) than the ones without. Serum S100 protein was shown to be discriminative between patients with and without metastases (receiver-operating characteristic, p = 0.012) with 75% sensitivity and 92% specificity. CONCLUSION: Serum S100 protein appears to be a sensitive as well as specific marker to detect metastases. We therefore might recommend serum S100 assessment to be included in the baseline staging of MUP.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Baseline staging is important in all melanoma types, including melanoma with unknown primary site (MUP). Staging includes different examination strategies, each with different accuracy. OBJECTIVE: To determine the value of serum S100 protein levels and positron emission tomography (PET) in the baseline staging of MUP. METHODS: Twenty patients with MUP were evaluable for the analysis between 1996 and 2007 with both S100 assessment and PET performed for baseline staging. RESULTS: Serum S100 was elevated in 7 patients (35%). The PET scan detected the metastases in 6 of 7 patients with elevated serum S100 protein showing a strong correlation (p = 0.005). Patients with metastases had significantly higher serum S100 levels (p = 0.01) than the ones without. Serum S100 protein was shown to be discriminative between patients with and without metastases (receiver-operating characteristic, p = 0.012) with 75% sensitivity and 92% specificity. CONCLUSION: Serum S100 protein appears to be a sensitive as well as specific marker to detect metastases. We therefore might recommend serum S100 assessment to be included in the baseline staging of MUP.

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6 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2008
Deposited On:26 Feb 2009 15:11
Last Modified:04 Aug 2016 07:25
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:1018-8665
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000155878
PubMed ID:18799883

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