UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

IL-22 is expressed by Th17 cells in an IL-23-dependent fashion, but not required for the development of autoimmune encephalomyelitis


Kreymborg, Katharina; Etzensperger, Ruth; Dumoutier, Laure; Haak, Stefan; Rebollo, Angelita; Buch, Thorsten; Heppner, Frank L; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Becher, Burkhard (2007). IL-22 is expressed by Th17 cells in an IL-23-dependent fashion, but not required for the development of autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Journal of Immunology, 179(12):8098-8104.

Abstract

Lately, IL-17-secreting Th cells have received an overwhelming amount of attention and are now widely held to be the major pathogenic population in autoimmune diseases. In particular, IL-22-secreting Th17 cells were shown to specifically mark the highly pathogenic population of self-reactive T cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). As IL-17A itself was found to only play a minor role during the development of EAE, IL-22 is now postulated to contribute to the pathogenic function of Th17 cells. The goal of this study was to determine the role and function of IL-22 during the development of CNS autoimmunity in vivo. We found that CNS-invading encephalitogenic Th17 cells coexpress IL-22 and that IL-22 is specifically induced by IL-23 in autoimmune-pathogenic CD4+ T cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. We next generated IL-22-/- mice, which--in contrast to the prediction that expression of inflammatory cytokines by CNS-invading T cells inevitably confers pathogenic function--turned out to be fully susceptible to EAE. Taken together, we show that self-reactive Th cells coexpress IL-17 and IL-22, but that the latter also does not appear to be directly involved in autoimmune pathogenesis of the CNS.

Abstract

Lately, IL-17-secreting Th cells have received an overwhelming amount of attention and are now widely held to be the major pathogenic population in autoimmune diseases. In particular, IL-22-secreting Th17 cells were shown to specifically mark the highly pathogenic population of self-reactive T cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). As IL-17A itself was found to only play a minor role during the development of EAE, IL-22 is now postulated to contribute to the pathogenic function of Th17 cells. The goal of this study was to determine the role and function of IL-22 during the development of CNS autoimmunity in vivo. We found that CNS-invading encephalitogenic Th17 cells coexpress IL-22 and that IL-22 is specifically induced by IL-23 in autoimmune-pathogenic CD4+ T cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. We next generated IL-22-/- mice, which--in contrast to the prediction that expression of inflammatory cytokines by CNS-invading T cells inevitably confers pathogenic function--turned out to be fully susceptible to EAE. Taken together, we show that self-reactive Th cells coexpress IL-17 and IL-22, but that the latter also does not appear to be directly involved in autoimmune pathogenesis of the CNS.

Citations

181 citations in Web of Science®
194 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:20 Jun 2012 07:40
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:02
Publisher:American Association of Immunologists
ISSN:0022-1767
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.179.12.8098
PubMed ID:18056351

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations