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MHC-restricted T cell receptor signaling is required for alpha beta TCR replacement of the pre T cell receptor


Croxford, Andrew L; Akilli-Ozturk, Ozlem; Rieux-Laucat, Frederic; Förster, Irmgard; Waisman, Ari; Buch, Thorsten (2008). MHC-restricted T cell receptor signaling is required for alpha beta TCR replacement of the pre T cell receptor. European Journal of Immunology, 38(2):391-399.

Abstract

A developmental block is imposed on CD25(+)CD44(-) thymocytes at the beta-selection checkpoint in the absence of the pre T cell receptor (preTCR) alpha-chain, pTalpha. Early surface expression of a transgenic alphabeta TCR has been shown to partially circumvent this block, such that thymocytes progress to the CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive stage. We wanted to analyze whether a restricting MHC element is required for alphabeta TCR-expressing double-negative (DN) thymocytes to overcome the developmental block in pTalpha-deficient animals. We used the HY-I knock-in model that endows thymocytes with alphabeta TCR expression in the DN compartment but has the advantage of physiological expression levels, in contrast to conventional TCR transgenes. On a pTalpha-deficient background, this HY-I TCR transgene 'rescued' CD25(+)CD44(-) thymocytes from apoptosis and enabled progression to later differentiation stages. On a non-selecting MHC background, however, pTalpha-deficient HY-I mice presented a pronounced reduction in numbers of splenocytes and thymocytes when compared to animals of selecting MHC genotype, showing that MHC restriction is necessary to drive HY-TCR-mediated rescue of pTalpha-deficient thymocytes.

A developmental block is imposed on CD25(+)CD44(-) thymocytes at the beta-selection checkpoint in the absence of the pre T cell receptor (preTCR) alpha-chain, pTalpha. Early surface expression of a transgenic alphabeta TCR has been shown to partially circumvent this block, such that thymocytes progress to the CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive stage. We wanted to analyze whether a restricting MHC element is required for alphabeta TCR-expressing double-negative (DN) thymocytes to overcome the developmental block in pTalpha-deficient animals. We used the HY-I knock-in model that endows thymocytes with alphabeta TCR expression in the DN compartment but has the advantage of physiological expression levels, in contrast to conventional TCR transgenes. On a pTalpha-deficient background, this HY-I TCR transgene 'rescued' CD25(+)CD44(-) thymocytes from apoptosis and enabled progression to later differentiation stages. On a non-selecting MHC background, however, pTalpha-deficient HY-I mice presented a pronounced reduction in numbers of splenocytes and thymocytes when compared to animals of selecting MHC genotype, showing that MHC restriction is necessary to drive HY-TCR-mediated rescue of pTalpha-deficient thymocytes.

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3 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Experimental Immunology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:19 Jun 2012 14:48
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:02
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0014-2980
Publisher DOI:10.1002/eji.200737054
PubMed ID:18203137

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