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Frontier Encounters - Indigenous Communities and Settlers in Asia and Latin America


Geiger, Danilo (2008). Frontier Encounters - Indigenous Communities and Settlers in Asia and Latin America. Kopenhagen.

Abstract

Poverty and the maldistribution of land in core areas of developing countries, together with state schemes for the colonization of unruly frontiers, have forced indigenous peoples and settlers into an uneasy co-existence. Presenting material from various Asian and Latin American countries, Frontier Encounters examines factors that make for conflict and accommodation, studies the role of policy frames, and looks at promising mitigation strategies. The range of topics covered by the articles includes the texture of everyday-relations at the settlement frontier and the reconfiguration of ethnic hierarchies in tune with changing conquest cycles; settler land and resource use strategies; anti-settler riots and their politics; peace accords and what they can and cannot achieve as instruments for halting migration-induced violence; communal land titles as a promising avenue for conflict prevention and the empowerment of weak and defenseless groups; and the need for balancing indigenous rights advocacy with support and legal protection for disenfranchised parts of the settler population.
Danilo Geiger has an M. A. in social anthropology from the University of Zürich, Switzerland and is a lecturer in political anthropology. His experience includes fieldwork in the Philippines and Indonesia and he is currently coordinating a four-year comparative research project on conflicts between indigenous communities and settlers in South and Southeast Asia.

Poverty and the maldistribution of land in core areas of developing countries, together with state schemes for the colonization of unruly frontiers, have forced indigenous peoples and settlers into an uneasy co-existence. Presenting material from various Asian and Latin American countries, Frontier Encounters examines factors that make for conflict and accommodation, studies the role of policy frames, and looks at promising mitigation strategies. The range of topics covered by the articles includes the texture of everyday-relations at the settlement frontier and the reconfiguration of ethnic hierarchies in tune with changing conquest cycles; settler land and resource use strategies; anti-settler riots and their politics; peace accords and what they can and cannot achieve as instruments for halting migration-induced violence; communal land titles as a promising avenue for conflict prevention and the empowerment of weak and defenseless groups; and the need for balancing indigenous rights advocacy with support and legal protection for disenfranchised parts of the settler population.
Danilo Geiger has an M. A. in social anthropology from the University of Zürich, Switzerland and is a lecturer in political anthropology. His experience includes fieldwork in the Philippines and Indonesia and he is currently coordinating a four-year comparative research project on conflicts between indigenous communities and settlers in South and Southeast Asia.

Additional indexing

Item Type:Monograph
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Department of Social Anthropology and Cultural Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:390 Customs, etiquette & folklore
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
790 Sports, games & entertainment
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:18 Feb 2009 10:37
Last Modified:03 May 2016 19:29
Volume:IWGIA Document no. 120
ISBN:978-87-91563-15-7
Official URL:http://www.iwgia.org/sw27369.asp
Related URLs:http://www.recherche-portal.ch/ZAD:default_scope:ebi01_prod005669796 (Library Catalogue)

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