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Amino acid transport in schistosomes: Characterization of the permeaseheavy chain SPRM1hc


Krautz-Peterson, G; Camargo, S; Huggel, K; Verrey, F; Shoemaker, C B; Skelly, P J (2007). Amino acid transport in schistosomes: Characterization of the permeaseheavy chain SPRM1hc. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 282(30):21767-21775.

Abstract

Schistosomes are human parasitic flatworms that constitute an important public health problem globally. Adult parasites live in the bloodstream where they import nutrients such as amino acids across their body surface (the tegument). One amino acid transporter, Schistosome Permease 1 light chain, SPRM1lc, a member of the glycoprotein-associated family of transporters (gpaAT), has been characterized in schistosomes. Only a single member of the SLC3 family of glycoproteins that associate with gpaATs is found following extensive searching of the genomes of Schistosoma mansoni and S. japonicum. In this report, we characterize this schistosome permease heavy chain (SPRM1hc) gene and protein. The 72-kDa gene product is predicted to possess a single transmembrane domain, a (betaalpha)(8) (TIM barrel) conformation and a catalytic triad. Xenopus oocytes functionally expressing SPRM1hc with SPRM1lc import phenylalanine, arginine, lysine, alanine, glutamine, histidine, tryptophan, and leucine. Biochemical characterization demonstrates that in Xenopus extracts and in schistosome extracts SPRM1hc is associated into a high molecular weight complex with SPRM1lc that is disrupted by reducing agents. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western analysis demonstrate that SPRM1hc is expressed in each schistosome life stage examined (eggs, cercariae, schistosomula, adult males and females). SPRM1hc is widely distributed throughout adult male and female worms as determined by immunolocalization. Consistent with the hypothesis that SPRM1hc functions to facilitate nutrient uptake from host blood, immunogold electron microscopy confirms that the protein is distributed on the host-interactive tegumental membranes. We propose that surface-exposed, host-interactive, nutrient-transporting proteins like the SPRM1 heterodimer are promising vaccine candidates.

Schistosomes are human parasitic flatworms that constitute an important public health problem globally. Adult parasites live in the bloodstream where they import nutrients such as amino acids across their body surface (the tegument). One amino acid transporter, Schistosome Permease 1 light chain, SPRM1lc, a member of the glycoprotein-associated family of transporters (gpaAT), has been characterized in schistosomes. Only a single member of the SLC3 family of glycoproteins that associate with gpaATs is found following extensive searching of the genomes of Schistosoma mansoni and S. japonicum. In this report, we characterize this schistosome permease heavy chain (SPRM1hc) gene and protein. The 72-kDa gene product is predicted to possess a single transmembrane domain, a (betaalpha)(8) (TIM barrel) conformation and a catalytic triad. Xenopus oocytes functionally expressing SPRM1hc with SPRM1lc import phenylalanine, arginine, lysine, alanine, glutamine, histidine, tryptophan, and leucine. Biochemical characterization demonstrates that in Xenopus extracts and in schistosome extracts SPRM1hc is associated into a high molecular weight complex with SPRM1lc that is disrupted by reducing agents. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western analysis demonstrate that SPRM1hc is expressed in each schistosome life stage examined (eggs, cercariae, schistosomula, adult males and females). SPRM1hc is widely distributed throughout adult male and female worms as determined by immunolocalization. Consistent with the hypothesis that SPRM1hc functions to facilitate nutrient uptake from host blood, immunogold electron microscopy confirms that the protein is distributed on the host-interactive tegumental membranes. We propose that surface-exposed, host-interactive, nutrient-transporting proteins like the SPRM1 heterodimer are promising vaccine candidates.

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Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:27 July 2007
Deposited On:27 Mar 2009 13:48
Last Modified:04 Sep 2016 07:19
Publisher:American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
ISSN:0021-9258
Additional Information:This research was originally published in Krautz-Peterson, G; Camargo, S; Huggel, K; Verrey, F; Shoemaker, C B; Skelly, P J (2007). Amino acid transport in schistosomes: Characterization of the permeaseheavy chain SPRM1hc. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 282(30):21767-21775. © the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M703512200
PubMed ID:17545149
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-14336

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