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Periodic whole body acceleration: a novel therapy for cardiovascular disease


Kohler, M; Amann-Vesti, B R; Clarenbach, C F; Brack, T; Noll, G; Russi, E W; Bloch, K E (2007). Periodic whole body acceleration: a novel therapy for cardiovascular disease. VASA, 36(4):261-266.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Periodic whole body acceleration in the spinal axis (pGz) applied by a motion platform is a novel treatment modality that induced endothelial nitric oxide release into the circulation of animals, healthy subjects and patients with inflammatory diseases during single treatment sessions in previous studies. We hypothesized that patients with advanced arteriosclerotic diseases who are not candidates for a surgical intervention would clinically benefit from repeated pGz treatments over several weeks through improvement of endothelial function. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 11 patients, 5 men (37 to 71 y) with stable ischemic heart disease, LVEF < 35%, NYHA stage > II, and 6 patients (51 to 83 y, 1 woman) with intermittent leg claudication, Fontaine stage II, were enrolled after optimization of pharmacological therapy. PGz was applied for 40 min, 5 days/week during 5 weeks. Quality of life (SF-36 questionnaire), exercise performance, and endothelial function were assessed at baseline, during the treatment period, and 4 weeks after discontinuation of pGz. RESULTS: PGz was well tolerated. In heart failure paitents, pGz therapy improved quality of life, increased 6 min walking distance by a mean +/- SE of 105 +/- 24 m, and improved postischemic skin hyperemia (p < .05 in all instances). In 4 of 6 patients with intermittent claudication, quality of life, treadmill walking distance and post-ischemic skin hyperemia improved with pGz therapy (p < .05). Four weeks after discontinuation of pGz, most therapeutic effects had vanished in both patient groups. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with severe heart failure and with leg claudication who remain symptomatic despite maximal medical therapy and who were not candidates for surgery, periodic acceleration applied over several weeks improved quality of life and exercise capacity. The clinical benefits appear to be mediated through improved endothelial function.

BACKGROUND: Periodic whole body acceleration in the spinal axis (pGz) applied by a motion platform is a novel treatment modality that induced endothelial nitric oxide release into the circulation of animals, healthy subjects and patients with inflammatory diseases during single treatment sessions in previous studies. We hypothesized that patients with advanced arteriosclerotic diseases who are not candidates for a surgical intervention would clinically benefit from repeated pGz treatments over several weeks through improvement of endothelial function. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 11 patients, 5 men (37 to 71 y) with stable ischemic heart disease, LVEF < 35%, NYHA stage > II, and 6 patients (51 to 83 y, 1 woman) with intermittent leg claudication, Fontaine stage II, were enrolled after optimization of pharmacological therapy. PGz was applied for 40 min, 5 days/week during 5 weeks. Quality of life (SF-36 questionnaire), exercise performance, and endothelial function were assessed at baseline, during the treatment period, and 4 weeks after discontinuation of pGz. RESULTS: PGz was well tolerated. In heart failure paitents, pGz therapy improved quality of life, increased 6 min walking distance by a mean +/- SE of 105 +/- 24 m, and improved postischemic skin hyperemia (p < .05 in all instances). In 4 of 6 patients with intermittent claudication, quality of life, treadmill walking distance and post-ischemic skin hyperemia improved with pGz therapy (p < .05). Four weeks after discontinuation of pGz, most therapeutic effects had vanished in both patient groups. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with severe heart failure and with leg claudication who remain symptomatic despite maximal medical therapy and who were not candidates for surgery, periodic acceleration applied over several weeks improved quality of life and exercise capacity. The clinical benefits appear to be mediated through improved endothelial function.

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10 citations in Web of Science®
9 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 2007
Deposited On:19 Mar 2009 18:31
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:03
Publisher:Hans Huber
ISSN:0301-1526
Publisher DOI:10.1024/0301-1526.36.4.261
PubMed ID:18357918

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