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Timing the arrival at 2340 m altitude for aerobic performance


Schuler, B; Thomsen, J J; Gassmann, M; Lundby, C (2007). Timing the arrival at 2340 m altitude for aerobic performance. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 17(5):588-594.

Abstract

This study tested the hypothesis that maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) and performance increase upon altitude acclimatization at moderate altitude. Eight elite cyclists were studied at sea level, and after 1 (Day 1), 7 (Day 7), 14 (Day 14) and 21 (Day 21) days of exposure to 2340 m. Capillary blood samples were taken on these days before performing two consecutive maximal exercise trials. Acclimatization increased hemoglobin concentration and arterial oxygen content. On Day 1, VO(2max) and time to exhaustion (at 80% of sea-level maximal power output) decreased by 12.8% (P<0.05) and 25.8% (P<0.05), respectively, compared with the corresponding sea-level values. Subsequently, these parameters increased by 3.2% (P<0.05) and 6.0% (P<0.05) from Days 1 to 7, by 4.8% (P<0.05) and 5.7% (P<0.05) from Days 7 to 14, followed by 0.7% (P>0.05) and 1.4% (P>0.05) from Days 14 to 21, respectively. These data suggest that endurance athletes competing at altitudes around 2340 m should expose themselves to this altitude at least 14 days before competition.

Abstract

This study tested the hypothesis that maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) and performance increase upon altitude acclimatization at moderate altitude. Eight elite cyclists were studied at sea level, and after 1 (Day 1), 7 (Day 7), 14 (Day 14) and 21 (Day 21) days of exposure to 2340 m. Capillary blood samples were taken on these days before performing two consecutive maximal exercise trials. Acclimatization increased hemoglobin concentration and arterial oxygen content. On Day 1, VO(2max) and time to exhaustion (at 80% of sea-level maximal power output) decreased by 12.8% (P<0.05) and 25.8% (P<0.05), respectively, compared with the corresponding sea-level values. Subsequently, these parameters increased by 3.2% (P<0.05) and 6.0% (P<0.05) from Days 1 to 7, by 4.8% (P<0.05) and 5.7% (P<0.05) from Days 7 to 14, followed by 0.7% (P>0.05) and 1.4% (P>0.05) from Days 14 to 21, respectively. These data suggest that endurance athletes competing at altitudes around 2340 m should expose themselves to this altitude at least 14 days before competition.

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35 citations in Web of Science®
33 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:October 2007
Deposited On:20 Mar 2009 10:19
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:03
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0905-7188
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0838.2006.00611.x
Official URL:http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118521465/abstract
PubMed ID:17316377

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