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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-14449

Maurer, Urs; Brem, S; Bucher, K; Kranz, F; Benz, R; Steinhausen, H C; Brandeis, D (2007). Impaired tuning of a fast occipito-temporal response for print in dyslexic children learning to read. Brain: A Journal of Neurology, 130(12):3200-3210.

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Abstract

Developmental dyslexia is defined as a disorder of learning to read. It is thus critical to examine the neural processes that impair learning to read during the early phase of reading acquisition, before compensatory mechanisms are adapted by older readers with dyslexia. Using electroencephalography-based event-related imaging, we investigated how tuning of visual activity for print advances in the same children before and after initial reading training in school. The focus was on a fast, coarse form of visual tuning for print, measured as an increase of the occipito-temporal N1 response at 150-270 ms in the event-related potential (ERP) to words compared to symbol strings. The results demonstrate that the initial development of reading skills and visual tuning for print progressed more slowly in those children who became dyslexic than in their control peers. Print-specific tuning in 2nd grade strongly distinguished dyslexic children from controls. It was maximal in the inferior occipito-temporal cortex, left-lateralized in controls, and reduced in dyslexic children. The results suggest that delayed initial visual tuning for print critically contributes to the development of dyslexia.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
DDC:570 Life sciences; biology
150 Psychology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:December 2007
Deposited On:19 Mar 2009 16:52
Last Modified:23 Jul 2014 12:14
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0006-8950
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:10.1093/brain/awm193
PubMed ID:17728359
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 63
Google Scholar™
Scopus®. Citation Count: 69

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