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Cortical activation resulting from painless vibrotactile dental stimulation measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI)


Ettlin, D A; et al; Lutz, Kai; Jäncke, Lutz (2004). Cortical activation resulting from painless vibrotactile dental stimulation measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI). Journal of Dental Research, 83(10):757-761.

Abstract

There have been few investigations on hemodynamic responses in the human cortex resulting from dental stimulation. Identification of cortical areas involved in stimulus perception may offer new targets for pain treatment. This initial study aimed at establishing a cortical map of dental representation, based on non-invasive fMRI measurements. Five right-handed subjects were studied. Eight maxillary and 8 mandibular teeth were stimulated after the vibratory perception threshold was determined for each tooth. Suprathreshold stimulation was repeated thrice per session, in a total of three sessions performed on three consecutive days. Statistical inference on cluster level identified increased blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal during vibratory dental stimulation, primarily in the insular cortex bilaterally and in the supplementary motor cortex. No significant brain activation was observed in the somatosensory cortex with this stimulation protocol. These results agree with previous findings obtained from invasive direct electrical cortical stimulation of the human insula.

Abstract

There have been few investigations on hemodynamic responses in the human cortex resulting from dental stimulation. Identification of cortical areas involved in stimulus perception may offer new targets for pain treatment. This initial study aimed at establishing a cortical map of dental representation, based on non-invasive fMRI measurements. Five right-handed subjects were studied. Eight maxillary and 8 mandibular teeth were stimulated after the vibratory perception threshold was determined for each tooth. Suprathreshold stimulation was repeated thrice per session, in a total of three sessions performed on three consecutive days. Statistical inference on cluster level identified increased blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal during vibratory dental stimulation, primarily in the insular cortex bilaterally and in the supplementary motor cortex. No significant brain activation was observed in the somatosensory cortex with this stimulation protocol. These results agree with previous findings obtained from invasive direct electrical cortical stimulation of the human insula.

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27 citations in Web of Science®
28 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Masticatory Disorders and Complete Dentures, Geriatric and Special Care Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 October 2004
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:23
Last Modified:01 Nov 2016 08:28
Publisher:Sage Publications
ISSN:0022-0345
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/154405910408301004
Related URLs:http://jdr.iadrjournals.org/cgi//full/83/10/757
PubMed ID:15381714

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