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Michelotti, A; Farella, M; Gallo, L M; Veltri, A; Palla, S; Martina, R (2005). Effect of occlusal interference on habitual activity of human masseter. Journal of Dental Research, 84(7):644-648.

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Abstract

It has been suggested that occlusal interference may increase habitual activity in the jaw muscles and may lead to temporomandibular disorders (TMD). We tested these hypotheses by means of a double-blind randomized crossover experiment carried out on 11 young healthy females. Strips of gold foil were glued either on a selected occlusal contact area (active interference) or on the vestibular surface of the same tooth (dummy interference) and left for 8 days each. Electromyographic masseter activity was recorded in the natural environment by portable recorders under interference-free, dummy-interference, and active-interference conditions. The active occlusal interference caused a significant reduction in the number of activity periods per hour and in their mean amplitude. The EMG activity did not change significantly during the dummy-interference condition. None of the subjects developed signs and/or symptoms of TMD throughout the whole study, and most of them adapted fairly well to the occlusal disturbance.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Masticatory Disorders and Complete Dentures, Geriatric and Special Care Dentistry
DDC:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 July 2005
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:23
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 20:13
Publisher:Sage Publications
ISSN:0022-0345
Publisher DOI:10.1177/154405910508400712
Related URLs:http://jdr.iadrjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/84/7/644
PubMed ID:15972594
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 31
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