UZH-Logo

Nocturnal masseter EMG activity of healthy subjects in a natural environment.


Gallo, L M; Gross, S S; Palla, S (1999). Nocturnal masseter EMG activity of healthy subjects in a natural environment. Journal of Dental Research, 78(8):1436-1444.

Abstract

Facial pain of patients with craniomandibular disorders might be caused by muscle overload. However, the activity of masticatory muscles of healthy individuals is still unknown. The aim of this study was therefore a first attempt to clarify this question by recording the masseter muscle activity of healthy subjects during sleep by means of portable recorders. The study was performed on 21 healthy subjects selected after telephone and questionnaire screenings and clinical examination from among randomly selected inhabitants of Zürich. The masseter EMG was recorded during seven nights in each subject's natural environment with the electrodes in reproducible position. The signal was analyzed for number, amplitude, and duration of contraction periods defined as signal portions above a threshold which could contain sub-threshold signal portions shorter than the standby time of 5 sec. The signal amplitude was expressed in percent of the amplitude recorded during maximum voluntary clenches (%MVC). An average of 71.9 +/- 28.7 contraction episodes per night (men, 74.7 +/- 30.1; women, 65.0 +/- 23.8; p = 0.043), i.e., of 10.5 +/- 3.8 per hour (men, 11.0 +/- 4.0; women, 9.3 +/- 3.0; p = 0.005), was found. The average mean amplitude was 26.2 +/- 6.4% MVC (men, 27.0 +/- 6.8; women, 24.4 +/- 4.5; p = 0.009). The duration of the episodes had a mode of 0.5 sec, and the group mean of the integral of the amplitude over time was 123.7 +/- 157.9% MVC (men, 138.9 +/- 184.0; women, 85.9 +/- 28.2; p = 0.005). Healthy subjects showed intermittent periods of masseter activity during sleep which, on average, were of rather low intensity and short duration.

Facial pain of patients with craniomandibular disorders might be caused by muscle overload. However, the activity of masticatory muscles of healthy individuals is still unknown. The aim of this study was therefore a first attempt to clarify this question by recording the masseter muscle activity of healthy subjects during sleep by means of portable recorders. The study was performed on 21 healthy subjects selected after telephone and questionnaire screenings and clinical examination from among randomly selected inhabitants of Zürich. The masseter EMG was recorded during seven nights in each subject's natural environment with the electrodes in reproducible position. The signal was analyzed for number, amplitude, and duration of contraction periods defined as signal portions above a threshold which could contain sub-threshold signal portions shorter than the standby time of 5 sec. The signal amplitude was expressed in percent of the amplitude recorded during maximum voluntary clenches (%MVC). An average of 71.9 +/- 28.7 contraction episodes per night (men, 74.7 +/- 30.1; women, 65.0 +/- 23.8; p = 0.043), i.e., of 10.5 +/- 3.8 per hour (men, 11.0 +/- 4.0; women, 9.3 +/- 3.0; p = 0.005), was found. The average mean amplitude was 26.2 +/- 6.4% MVC (men, 27.0 +/- 6.8; women, 24.4 +/- 4.5; p = 0.009). The duration of the episodes had a mode of 0.5 sec, and the group mean of the integral of the amplitude over time was 123.7 +/- 157.9% MVC (men, 138.9 +/- 184.0; women, 85.9 +/- 28.2; p = 0.005). Healthy subjects showed intermittent periods of masseter activity during sleep which, on average, were of rather low intensity and short duration.

Citations

45 citations in Web of Science®
44 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Masticatory Disorders and Complete Dentures, Geriatric and Special Care Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 August 1999
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:23
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:19
Publisher:Sage Publications
ISSN:0022-0345
Publisher DOI:10.1177/00220345990780080901
Related URLs:http://jdr.iadrjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/78/8/1436
PubMed ID:10439031

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations