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Long-term survival estimates of cast gold inlays and onlays with their analysis of failures.


Studer, S P; Wettstein, F; Lehner, C; Zullo, T G; Schärer, P (2000). Long-term survival estimates of cast gold inlays and onlays with their analysis of failures. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 27(6):461-472.

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical behaviour of cast gold restorations with respect to define a gold control against current and future ceramic and composite restorations. The study sample included 50 patients with 303 cast gold restorations. All restorations were cemented with a non-adhesive technique. A total of 303 restorations were evaluated clinically and radiographically using modified United States Public Health Service criteria. Restorations recorded as having an A- or a B-rating were defined as successful. Of the 303 restorations, 42 were judged as failures, which resulted in a failure rate of 13.8% for a mean observation time (+/- s.d.) of 18.7 ( +/- 9.5) years. The estimated Kaplan-Meier survival rates (s.e.) were 96.1% (+/- 1.1%) at 10 years, 87.0% (+/- 2.2%) at 20 years and 73.5% (+/- 5.4%) at 30 years. In total, biological reasons were counted 25 times in comparison to 17 technical reasons for those 42 failed cast gold restorations, with 17 secondary caries (40%) as the most common biological reason and with 13 retention losses (31%) as the most common technical reason. The endodontically treated tooth was exclusively identified as a risk factor. The restoration type (inlay versus onlay) did not influence the survival rate.

The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical behaviour of cast gold restorations with respect to define a gold control against current and future ceramic and composite restorations. The study sample included 50 patients with 303 cast gold restorations. All restorations were cemented with a non-adhesive technique. A total of 303 restorations were evaluated clinically and radiographically using modified United States Public Health Service criteria. Restorations recorded as having an A- or a B-rating were defined as successful. Of the 303 restorations, 42 were judged as failures, which resulted in a failure rate of 13.8% for a mean observation time (+/- s.d.) of 18.7 ( +/- 9.5) years. The estimated Kaplan-Meier survival rates (s.e.) were 96.1% (+/- 1.1%) at 10 years, 87.0% (+/- 2.2%) at 20 years and 73.5% (+/- 5.4%) at 30 years. In total, biological reasons were counted 25 times in comparison to 17 technical reasons for those 42 failed cast gold restorations, with 17 secondary caries (40%) as the most common biological reason and with 13 retention losses (31%) as the most common technical reason. The endodontically treated tooth was exclusively identified as a risk factor. The restoration type (inlay versus onlay) did not influence the survival rate.

Citations

18 citations in Web of Science®
22 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 June 2000
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:23
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:19
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0305-182X
Publisher DOI:10.1046/j.1365-2842.2000.00540.x
PubMed ID:10888273

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