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Progressive, generalized, apical idiopathic root resorption and hypercementosis.


Schätzle, M; Tanner, S D; Bosshardt, D D (2005). Progressive, generalized, apical idiopathic root resorption and hypercementosis. Journal of Periodontology, 76(11):2002-2011.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Root resorption is a multifactorial process that results in loss of tooth structure. The causes of root resorption may vary, leading to several types of resorptions. Some factors have been identified and may be categorized into physiological resorption, local factors, systemic conditions, and idiopathic resorptions. The objective of this report was to present a case of a 17-year-old white female with progressive, generalized, apical idiopathic root resorption followed up for 34 months. METHODS: Two panoramic radiographs, 14 and 34 months after initial clinical and radiological examinations, showed the rapid progression of apical root resorption. Two molars, teeth #15 and #16, which had to be extracted, and a bone sample from the distal aspect of tooth #15 were processed for histologic analysis. RESULTS: Two millimeters apical to the cemento-enamel junction, an abrupt increase in the cementum thickness was noted, amounting to 300 and 800 microm in teeth #15 and #16, respectively. The thickening of the cementum layer was due to an accelerated deposition of cellular intrinsic fiber cementum. An unusually high number of mineralization foci were observed in association with acellular extrinsic fiber cementum, and both free and fused cementicles were seen. In contrast to tooth #16, tooth #15 revealed extensive dentin replacement by a bone-like and a cementum-like tissue. Furthermore, ankylosis was demonstrated in tooth #15 and confirmed in the bone sample. CONCLUSIONS: At present, there is no preventive or therapeutic regimen for the type of root resorption seen in this case report. Treatment usually consists of the extraction of teeth with advanced lesions.

BACKGROUND: Root resorption is a multifactorial process that results in loss of tooth structure. The causes of root resorption may vary, leading to several types of resorptions. Some factors have been identified and may be categorized into physiological resorption, local factors, systemic conditions, and idiopathic resorptions. The objective of this report was to present a case of a 17-year-old white female with progressive, generalized, apical idiopathic root resorption followed up for 34 months. METHODS: Two panoramic radiographs, 14 and 34 months after initial clinical and radiological examinations, showed the rapid progression of apical root resorption. Two molars, teeth #15 and #16, which had to be extracted, and a bone sample from the distal aspect of tooth #15 were processed for histologic analysis. RESULTS: Two millimeters apical to the cemento-enamel junction, an abrupt increase in the cementum thickness was noted, amounting to 300 and 800 microm in teeth #15 and #16, respectively. The thickening of the cementum layer was due to an accelerated deposition of cellular intrinsic fiber cementum. An unusually high number of mineralization foci were observed in association with acellular extrinsic fiber cementum, and both free and fused cementicles were seen. In contrast to tooth #16, tooth #15 revealed extensive dentin replacement by a bone-like and a cementum-like tissue. Furthermore, ankylosis was demonstrated in tooth #15 and confirmed in the bone sample. CONCLUSIONS: At present, there is no preventive or therapeutic regimen for the type of root resorption seen in this case report. Treatment usually consists of the extraction of teeth with advanced lesions.

Citations

16 citations in Web of Science®
23 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 November 2005
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:19
Publisher:American Academy of Periodontology
ISSN:0022-3492
Publisher DOI:10.1902/jop.2005.76.11.2002
PubMed ID:16274322

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