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New insights into mechanisms of immunoregulation in 2007


Akdis, C A (2008). New insights into mechanisms of immunoregulation in 2007. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 122(4):700-709.

Abstract

Substantial progress in understanding the mechanisms of immune regulation in allergic diseases and asthma has been made during the last year. In asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis the immune system is activated by allergens, autoantigens, and components of superimposed infectious agents. Immune regulation in the lymphatic organs and in the tissue has an important role in the control and suppression of allergic disease in all stages of the inflammatory process, such as cell migration to tissues, cells gaining an inflammatory and tissue-destructive phenotype in the tissues, and their interaction with resident tissue cells to augment the inflammation. After the discovery of regulatory T cells, the importance of their unique suppressive capacity was strongly emphasized for the suppression of effector T-cell responses. However, it seems that all 3 subsets of effector T(H)1, T(H)2, and T(H)17 cells, as well as regulatory T cells, regulate each other at the level of transcription, major cytokines, and surface molecules. This review highlights key advances in immune regulation that were published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Substantial progress in understanding the mechanisms of immune regulation in allergic diseases and asthma has been made during the last year. In asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis the immune system is activated by allergens, autoantigens, and components of superimposed infectious agents. Immune regulation in the lymphatic organs and in the tissue has an important role in the control and suppression of allergic disease in all stages of the inflammatory process, such as cell migration to tissues, cells gaining an inflammatory and tissue-destructive phenotype in the tissues, and their interaction with resident tissue cells to augment the inflammation. After the discovery of regulatory T cells, the importance of their unique suppressive capacity was strongly emphasized for the suppression of effector T-cell responses. However, it seems that all 3 subsets of effector T(H)1, T(H)2, and T(H)17 cells, as well as regulatory T cells, regulate each other at the level of transcription, major cytokines, and surface molecules. This review highlights key advances in immune regulation that were published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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12 citations in Web of Science®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:24 Feb 2009 11:23
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:04
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0091-6749
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.jaci.2008.07.048
PubMed ID:19014761
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-15826

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