UZH-Logo

Accelerated treatment of postpneumonectomy empyema: a binational long-term study


Schneiter, D; Grodzki, T; Lardinois, D; Kestenholz, P B; Wojcik, J; Kubisa, B; Pierog, J; Weder, W (2008). Accelerated treatment of postpneumonectomy empyema: a binational long-term study. Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 136(1):179-185.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Postpneumonectomy empyema remains a clinical challenge. We proposed an accelerated therapy without an open chest window 5 years ago. This concept was evaluated on a larger scale in 2 centers in 2 different countries. METHODS: Between July 1995 and October 2005, 75 consecutive patients with postpneumonectomy empyema were treated in Szczecin, Poland (n = 35), and Zurich, Switzerland (n = 40). The therapy consisted of repeated open surgical debridement of the pleural cavity after achievement of general anesthesia, a negative pressure wound therapy of the temporarily closed chest cavity filled with povidone-iodine-soaked towels, and continuous suction and systemic antimicrobial therapy. If present, bronchopleural fistulae were closed and reinforced either with a muscle flap or the omentum. Finally, the pleural space was filled with an antibiotic solution and definitively closed. RESULTS: Of 75 patients (63 men; median age, 59 years; age range, 19-82 years), postpneumonectomy empyema was present on the right in 46 patients (32 with bronchopleural fistula) and in 29 patients (12 with bronchopleural fistula) on the left. Median time between pneumonectomy and postpneumonectomy empyema was 131 days (range, 7-7200 days). Bronchopleural fistulae have been closed and additionally reinforced by means of different methods (omentum, 18; muscle, 11; pericardial fat, 5; azygos vein, 1). The chest was definitively closed within 8 days in 94.6% of patients. The median hospitalization time was 18 days (range, 9-134 days). Postpneumonectomy empyema was successfully treated in 97.3% of patients, including 10 (13%) patients who needed a second treatment cycle. Three (4%) patients died within 90 days. The median follow-up time was 29.5 moths (range, 3-107 months). CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of postpneumonectomy empyema with the accelerated treatment is effective and safe. Our results are superior compared with those in reported series using a (temporary) chest fenestration. Patients appreciate the physical integrity of the chest.

OBJECTIVE: Postpneumonectomy empyema remains a clinical challenge. We proposed an accelerated therapy without an open chest window 5 years ago. This concept was evaluated on a larger scale in 2 centers in 2 different countries. METHODS: Between July 1995 and October 2005, 75 consecutive patients with postpneumonectomy empyema were treated in Szczecin, Poland (n = 35), and Zurich, Switzerland (n = 40). The therapy consisted of repeated open surgical debridement of the pleural cavity after achievement of general anesthesia, a negative pressure wound therapy of the temporarily closed chest cavity filled with povidone-iodine-soaked towels, and continuous suction and systemic antimicrobial therapy. If present, bronchopleural fistulae were closed and reinforced either with a muscle flap or the omentum. Finally, the pleural space was filled with an antibiotic solution and definitively closed. RESULTS: Of 75 patients (63 men; median age, 59 years; age range, 19-82 years), postpneumonectomy empyema was present on the right in 46 patients (32 with bronchopleural fistula) and in 29 patients (12 with bronchopleural fistula) on the left. Median time between pneumonectomy and postpneumonectomy empyema was 131 days (range, 7-7200 days). Bronchopleural fistulae have been closed and additionally reinforced by means of different methods (omentum, 18; muscle, 11; pericardial fat, 5; azygos vein, 1). The chest was definitively closed within 8 days in 94.6% of patients. The median hospitalization time was 18 days (range, 9-134 days). Postpneumonectomy empyema was successfully treated in 97.3% of patients, including 10 (13%) patients who needed a second treatment cycle. Three (4%) patients died within 90 days. The median follow-up time was 29.5 moths (range, 3-107 months). CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of postpneumonectomy empyema with the accelerated treatment is effective and safe. Our results are superior compared with those in reported series using a (temporary) chest fenestration. Patients appreciate the physical integrity of the chest.

Citations

27 citations in Web of Science®
36 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 26 Feb 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Thoracic Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2008
Deposited On:26 Feb 2009 16:14
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:04
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-5223
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.jtcvs.2008.01.036
PubMed ID:18603072
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-15871

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations