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Electroencephalography in the diagnosis of hydrocephalus in golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus)


Bali, M S; Gebhart-Henrich, S; Keller, P; Steiger, A; Gattermann, R; Bergamasco, L; Kronen, Peter W; Doherr, M G; Botteron, C; Tomek, A; Jaggy, A (2008). Electroencephalography in the diagnosis of hydrocephalus in golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Laboratory Animals, 42(2):213-221.

Abstract

The golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) is a popular laboratory animal and is used in a multitude of behavioural studies. However, it has been shown that it suffers from different forms of hereditary hydrocephalus, which may result in behavioural changes. This prospective study was designed to look into the usefulness of electroencephalography (EEG) measurements in the diagnosis of hydrocephalus in hamsters. The EEGs of the hydrocephalic hamsters were evaluated double-blind and showed a high-voltage slow wave activity, with a fast activity superimposed onto it. This pattern has already been well described in other hydrocephalic species and differed significantly from the EEGs that were obtained from the normal hamsters. It was concluded from our study that a background activity with an amplitude over 50 muV in combination with a frequency of < or =5 Hz was highly indicative of hydrocephalus in young hamsters. We believe that the EEG could be a very useful diagnostic tool in the screening for hydrocephalus in hamsters

The golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) is a popular laboratory animal and is used in a multitude of behavioural studies. However, it has been shown that it suffers from different forms of hereditary hydrocephalus, which may result in behavioural changes. This prospective study was designed to look into the usefulness of electroencephalography (EEG) measurements in the diagnosis of hydrocephalus in hamsters. The EEGs of the hydrocephalic hamsters were evaluated double-blind and showed a high-voltage slow wave activity, with a fast activity superimposed onto it. This pattern has already been well described in other hydrocephalic species and differed significantly from the EEGs that were obtained from the normal hamsters. It was concluded from our study that a background activity with an amplitude over 50 muV in combination with a frequency of < or =5 Hz was highly indicative of hydrocephalus in young hamsters. We believe that the EEG could be a very useful diagnostic tool in the screening for hydrocephalus in hamsters

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:20 Feb 2009 14:06
Last Modified:04 Jun 2016 07:26
Publisher:Royal Society of Medicine
ISSN:0023-6772
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1258/la.2007.007018
Official URL:http://la.rsmjournals.com/cgi/reprint/42/2/213.pdf
PubMed ID:18435879
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-15904

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